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History Nuclear Thermal Systems

Radiator LNTR: The Last of the Line

Hello, and welcome back to Beyond NERVA! Today, we’re finishing (for now) our in-depth look at liquid fueled nuclear thermal rockets, by looking at the second major type of liquid NTR (LNTR): the radiator-type LNTR. If you’re just joining us, make sure to check out the introduction (available here) and the bubbler post (available here) for some important context to understand how this design got here.

Rather than passing the propellant directly through the molten fuel, in this system the propellant would pass through the central void of the fuel element, becoming heated primarily through radiation (although some convection within the propellant flow would occur, overall it was a minor effect), hence the name.

This concept had been mentioned in previous works on bubbler-type LNTRs, and initial studies on the thermalization behavior of the propellant, and conversely fuel cooling behavior, were conducted during the early 1960s, but the first major study wouldn’t occur until 1966. However, it would also extend into the 1990s in its development, meaning that it was a far longer-lived design.

Let’s begin by looking at the differences between the bubbler and radiator designs, and why the radiator offers an attractive trade-off compared to the bubbler.

The Vapor Problem, or Is Homogenization of Propellant/Fuel Temp Worth It?

Liquid fuels offer many advantages for an NTR, including the fact that the fuel will distribute its heat evenly across the volume of the fuel element, the fact that the effective temperature of the fuel can be quite high, and that the fuel is able to be reasonably well contained with minimal theoretical challenges.

The bubbler design had an additional advantage: by passing the propellant directly through the fuel, in discrete enough bundles (the bubbles themselves) that the fuel and the propellant would have the same temperature.

Maximum specific impulse due to vapor pressure, Barrett Jr.

Sadly, there are significant challenges to making this sort of nuclear reactor into a rocket, the biggest one being propellant mass. These types of NTRs still use hydrogen propellant, the problem occurs in the fuel mass itself. As the bubbles move through the zirconium/niobium-uranium carbide fuel, it heats up rapidly, and the pressure drops significantly during this process. This means that all of the components of the fuel (the Zr/Nb, C, and U) end up vaporizing into the bubbles, to the point that the bubble is completely saturated by a mix of these elements in vapor form by the time it exits the fuel body. This is called vapor entrainment.

This is a major problem, because it means that the propellant leaving the nozzle has a far higher mass than the hydrogen that was originally input into the system. While there’s the possibility that a different propellant could be used which would not entrain as much of the fuel mass, but would also be higher molecular mass to start – to the point that the gains might likely outweigh the losses (if you feel like exploring this trade-off on a more technical footing, please let me know! I’d love to explore this more), and it wouldn’t eliminate the entrainment problem.

This led people to wonder if you have to pass the propellant through the fuel in the first place. After all, while there is a thermodynamically appealing symmetry to homogenizing your fuel and propellant temperatures, this isn’t actually necessary, is it? The fuel elements are already annular in shape, after all, so why not use them as a more traditional fuel element for an NTR? The lower surface area would mean that there’s less chance for the inconveniently high vapor pressure of the fuel would be mitigated by the fact that the majority of the propellant wouldn’t come in contact with the fuel (or even the layer of propellant that does interact with the fuel), meaning that the overall propellant molecular mass would be kept low… right?

The problem is that this means that the only method of heating the propellant becomes radiation (there’s a small amount of convection, but it’s so negligible that it can be ignored)… which isn’t that great in hydrogen, especially in the UV spectrum that most of the photons from the nuclear reaction are emitted in. The possibility of using either microparticles or vapors which would absorb the UV and re-emit it in a lower wavelength, which would be more easily absorbed by the hydrogen, was already being investigated in relation to gas core NTRs (which have the same problem, but in a completely different order of magnitude), and offered promise, but was also a compromise: this deliberately increases the molar mass of the propellant one way to minimize the molar mass a different way. This was a design possibility that needed to be carefully studied before it could be considered more feasible than the bubbler LNTR.

The leader of the effort to study this trade-off was one of the best-known fluid fueled NTR designers on the NASA side: Robert Ragsdale at Lewis Research Center (LRC, and we’ll come back to Ragsdale in gas core NTR design as well). There were a collection of studies around a particular design, beginning with a study looking at reactor geometry and fuel element size optimization to not only maximize the thrust and specific impulse, but also to minimize the uranium loss rates of the reactor.

This study concluded that there were many advantages to the radiator-type LNTR over the bubbler-type. The first consideration, minimizing the vapor entrainment problem that was laguing the bubbler, was minimized, but not completely eliminated, in the radiator design. The next conclusion is that the specific impulse of the negine could be maintained, or increased, to 1400 s isp or more. Finally, one of th emost striking was in thrust-to-core-weight ratio, which went from about 1:1 in the Nelson/Princeton design that we discussed in the last post all the way up to 19:1 (potentially)! This is because the propellant flow rate isn’t limited y the bubble velocity moving through the fuel (for more detail on this problem, and the other related constraints, check out the last blog post, here).

These conclusions led to NASA gathering a team of researchers, including Ragsdale, Kasack, Donovan, Putre, and others ti develop the Lewis LNTR reactor.

Lewis LNTR: The First of the Line

Lweis Radiator LNTR, Ragsdale 1967

Once the basic feasibility of the radiator LNTR was demonstrated, a number of studies were conducted to determine the performance characteristics, as well as the basic engineering challenges, facing this type of NTR. They were conducted in 1967/68, and showed distinct promise, for the desired 2000 to 5000 MWt power range (similar to the Phoebus 2 reactor’s power goal, which remains the most powerful nuclear reactor ever tested at 3500 MWt).

Fuel tube cross-section, Putre 1968

As with any design, the first question was the basics of reactor configuration. The LRC team never looked at a single-tube LNTR, for a variety of reasons, and instead focused their efforts on a multi-tube design, but the number and diameter of the tubes was one of the major questions to be addressed in initial studies. Because of this, and the particular characteristics of the heat transfer required, the reactor would have many fuel elements with a diameter of between 1 and 4 inches, but which diameter was best would be a matter of quite some study.

Another question for the study team was what the fuel element temperature would be. As in every NTR design, the hotter the propellant, the higher the isp (all other things being equal), but as we saw in the bubbler design, higher temperatures also mean higher vapor pressure, meaning that mass is lost more easily into the propellant – which increases the propellant mass and reduces the isp, and at some point even cost more specific impulse due to higher mass than is gained with the higher temperature. Because the propellant and the fuel would only interact on the surface of the fuel element, the surface temperature of the fuel was the overriding consideration, and was also explored, in the range of 5000 to 6100 K.

Effect of Reactor Pressure on T/W Ratio and U mass loss ratio in H, Ragsdale 1967

The final consideration which was optimized in this design was engine operating pressures. Because this design wasn’t fundamentally limited by the bubble velocity and void fraction of the molten fuel, the chamber pressure could be increased significantly, leading to both more thrust and a higher thrust-to-weight ratio. However, the trade-off here is that at some point the propellant isn’t being completely thermalized, resulting in a lower specific impulse. This final consideration was explored in the range of 200 to 1000 atm (2020-10100 N/cm2).

The three primary goals were: to maximize specific impulse, maximize thrust-to-weight ratio, and minimize uranium mass loss. They quickly discovered that they couldn’t have their cake and eat it, too: higher temperatures, and therefore higher isp, led to faster U mass loss rates, increasing T/W ratio reduced the specific impulse, and minimizing the U loss rate hurt both T/W and isp. They could improve any one (or often two) of these characteristics, but always at the cost of the third characteristic.

Four potential LNTR configurations, note the tradeoffs between isp, T/W, and fuel loss rates. Ragsdale 1967

We’ll look at many of the design characteristics and engineering considerations of the LRC work in the next section on general design challenges and considerations for the radiator LNTR, but for now we’ll look at their final compromise reactor.

The reactor itself would be made up of several (oddly, never specified) fuel elements, in a beryllium structure, with each fuel element being made up of Be as well. These would be cooled by cryogenic hydrogen moving from the nozzle end to the spacecraft end of the reactor, before flowing back into the central void of the fuel element. As it was fed through the central annulus, it would be seeded with tungsten microparticles to increase the amount of heat the propellant would absorb. Finally, it would be exhausted through a standard De Laval nozzle to provide thrust.

Reference LRC LNTR design characteristics, Putre 1968

The final fuel that they settled on was a liquid ternary carbide design, with the majority of the fuel being niobium carbide (although ZrC was also considered), with a molar mass fraction of 0.02 being UC2. This compromise offered good power density for the reactor while minimizing the vaporization rate of the fuel mass. This would be held in 2 inch diameter, 5 foot long fuel element tubes, with a fuel surface temperature of 5060 K. The propellant would be pressurized to 200 atm in the reactor.

Final LRC LNTR Fuel Characteristics, Putre 1968

This led to a design that struck a compromise between isp, T/W, and U mass loss which was not only acceptable, but impressive: 1400 s isp (on par with some forms of electric propulsion), a T/W ratio (of the core alone) of 4, and a hydrogen-to-uranium flow rate ratio of 50.

They did observe that none of these characteristics were as high as they could be, especially in terms of T/W ratio (which they calculated could go as high as 19!), or isp (with a theoretical maximum of 1660), and the uranium loss was twice the theoretical minimum, but sadly the cost of maximizing any of these characteristics was so high from an engineering point of view that it wasn’t feasible.

Sadly, I haven’t been able to find any documentation on this reactor design – and very few references to it – after February 1968. The exact time of the cancellation, and the reasons why, are a mystery to me. If someone is able to help me find that information it would be greatly appreciated.

LARS: The Brookhaven Design

LARS cross section,

The radiator LNTR would remain dormant for decades, as astronuclear funding was scarce and focused on particular, well-characterized systems (most of which were electric powerplant concepts), until the start of the Space Exploration Initiative. In 1991, a conference was held to explore the use of various types of NTR in future crewed space missions. This led to many proposals, including one from the Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. This was the Liquid Annular Reactor System, or LARS.

A team of physicists and engineers, including Powell, Ludewig, Lazareth, and Maise decided to revisit the radiator LNTR design, but as far as I can tell didn’t use any of the research done by the LRC team. Due to the different design philosophies, lack of references, and also the general compartmentalization of knowledge within the different parts of the astronuclear community, I can only conclude that they began this design from scratch (if this is incorrect, and anyone has knowledge of this program, please get in contact with me!).

LARS was a very different design than the LRC concept, and seems to have gone through two distinct iterations. Rather than the high-pressure system that the LRC team investigated, this was a low-pressure, low-thrust design, which optimized a different characteristic: hydrogen dissociation. This maximizes the specific impulse of the NTR by reducing the mass of the propellant to the lowest theoretically possible mass while maintaining the temperature of the propellant (up to 1600 s, according to the BNL team). The other main distinction from the LRC design was the power level: rather than having a very powerful reactor (3000 to 5000 MWt), this was a modest reactor of only 200 MWt. This leads to a very different set of design tradeoffs, but many of the engineering and materials challenges remain the same.

LARS would continue to us NbC diluted with UC2, but the fuel would not completely melt in the fuel element, leaving a solid layer against the walls of the beryllium fuel element tube. This in turn would be regeneratively cooled with hydrogen flowing through a number of channels in the durm, as well as a gap surrounding the body of the fuel element which would also be filled with cold hydrogen. A drive system would be attached on the cold end of the tube to spin it at an appropriate rate (which was not detailed in the papers). The main changes were in the fuel element configuration, size, and number.

The first iteration of LARS was an interesting concept, using a folded-flow system. This used many small fuel element tubes, arranged in a similar manner to the flow channels in the Dumbo reactor, with the propellant moving from the center of the reactor to the outer circumference, before being ejected out of the nozzle of the reactor. Each layer of fuel elements contained eleven individual tubes, with between 1 and 10 layers of fuel elements in the reactor. As the number of layers increased, the length and radius of the fuel elements decreased.

One of the important notes that was made by the team at this early design date was that the perpendicular fuel element orientation would minimize the amount of fission products that would be ejected from the rocket. I’m unable to determine how this was done, other than if they were solids which would stick to the outside of the propellant flue, however.

Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to discover exactly why this design was abandoned for a more traditional LNTR architecture, but the need to cool the entire exterior of the reactor to keep it from melting seems to possibly be a concern. Reversing the flow, with the hot propellant being in the center of the reactor rather than the external circumference, seems like an easy fix if this was the primary concern, but the discussions of reactor architecture after this seem to pretty much ignore this early iteration. Another complication would be the complexity of the reactor architecture. Whether with dedicated motors, or with a geared system allowing one motor to spin multiple fuel elements, a complex system is needed to spin the fuel elements, which would not only be something which would potentially break down more, but also require far more mass than a simpler system.

The second version of LARS kept the same type of fuel, power output, and low pressure operation, but rather than using the folded flow concept it went with seven fuel elements in a beryllium body. The propellant would be used to cool first the nozzle of the rocket, then the rotating beryllium drum which contained the fuel element, before entering the main propellant channel. The final thermalization of the propellant would be facilitated by the use of tungsten microparticles in the H2, necessary due to the low partial pressure and high transparency of pure H2 (while the vapor pressure issues of any LNTR were acknowledged, the effect that this would have on the thermalization seems to have not been considered a significant factor in the seeding necessity) Two versions, defined by the emissivity of the fuel element, were proposed.

Final two LARS options, f is fuel emissivity, Maise 1999

This design was targeted to reach up to 2000 s isp, but due to uncertainties in U loss rates (as well as C and Nb), the overall mass of the propellant upon exiting the reactor was uncertain, so the authors used a range of 1600-2000 s. The thrust of the engine was approximately 20,000 N, which would result in a T/W ratio of about 1;1 when including a shadow shield (one author points out that without the shield the ratio would be about 3-4/1.

I have been unable to find the research reports themselves for this program (unlike the LRC design), so the specifics of the reactor physics tradeoffs, engineering compromises, actual years of research and the like aren’t something that I’m able to discuss. The majority of my sources are conference papers and journal articles, which occurred in 1991 and 1992, but there was one paper from 1999, so it was at least under discussion through the 1990s (interestingly, that paper discussed using LARS for the 550 AU mission concept, which later got remade into the FOCAL gravitational lens mission: https://www.centauri-dreams.org/2010/11/15/a-focal-mission-into-the-oort-cloud/ ).

This seems to be the last time that LARS has been mentioned in the technical literature, so while it is mentioned as the “baseline” liquid core concept in places such as Atomic Rockets (http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/enginelist2.php#id–Nuclear_Thermal–Liquid_Core–LARS) it has not been explored in depth since.

Lessons Learned, Lessons to Learn: The Challenges of LNTR

In many ways, the apparent dual genesis of radiator LNTRs offers the ability to look into two particular thought processes in what the challenges are with radiator-type LNTRs. One example of this is what’s discussed more in the “fundamental challenges” sections of the introductory section of the reports: for the LRC team they focus on vapor entrainment minimization, whereas in the BNL presentations it seems quite important to point out that “yes, containing a refractory in a spinning, gas cooled drum is relatively trivial.” This juxtaposition of foci is interesting to me, as an examination of the different engineering philosophies of the two teams, and the priorities of the times.

Wall Construction

Both the LRC and LARS LNTRs ended up with similar fuel element configurations: a high temperature material, with coolant tubes traveling the length of the fuel element walls to regeneratively cool the walls. This material would have to withstand not only the temperature of the fuel element, but also resist chemical attack by the hydrogen used for the regenerative cooling, as well as being able to withstand the mechanical strain of not only the spinning fuel, but also the torque from whatever drive system is used to spin the fuel element to maintain the centripetal force used to contain the fuel element.

Another constant concern is the temperature of the wall. While high temperature loadings can be handled using regenerative cooling, the more heat is removed from the fuel during the regenerative cooling step, but it reduces the specific impulse of the engine. Here’s a table from the LRC study that examines the implications of wall cooling ratio vs specific impulse in that design, which will also apply as a general rule of thumb for LARS:

However, from there, the two designs differed significantly. The LARS design is far simpler: a can of beryllium, with a total of 20% of the volume being the regenerative cooling channel. As mentioned previously, the fuel didn’t become completely molten, but remained solid (and mostly containing the ZrC/NbC component, with very little U). Surrounding the outside of the fuel element can itself was another coolant gap. This would then be mounted to the reactor body with a drive system at the ship end, and a bearing at the hot end. This would then be mounted in the stationary moderator which made up the majority of the internal volume of the reactor core, which was shielded from the heat in the fuel element in a very heterogeneous temperature profile.

The LRC concept on the other hand, was far more complex in some ways. Rather than using a metal can, the LRC design used graphite, which maintains its strength far better than many metals at high temperatures. A number of options were considered to maintain the wall of the can, due not only to the fuel mixture potentially attacking the graphite (as the carbon could be dissolved into the carbide of the fuel element), as well as attack from the hydrogen in the coolant channels (which would be able to be addressed in a similar way to how NERVA fuel elements used refractory metal coatings to prevent the same erosive effects).

The LRC design, since the fuel would be completely molten across the entire volume of the fuel element, was a more complex challenge. A number of options were considered to minimize the wall heating of the fuel element, including:

  • Selective fuel loading
    • A common strategy in solid fuel elements, this creates hotter and cooler zones in the fuel element
      • Neutron heating will distribute the radiative heating past U distribution
    • Convection and fuel mixing will end up distributing the fuel over time
    • May be able to be limited by affecting the temperature and viscosity of the fuel for the life of the reactor
  • Multiple fluids in fuel
    • Step beyond selective loading, a different material may be used as the outer layer of the fuel body, resisting mixing and reducing thermal load on the wall
  • Vapor insulation along exterior of fuel body
    • Using thermally opaque vapor to insulate the fuel element wall from the fuel body
    • Significantly reduces the heating on the outer wall
    • Two options for maintaining vapor wall:
      • Ablative coating on inner wall of fuel element can
      • Porous wall in can (similar to a low-flow version of a bubbler fuel element) pumping vapor into gap between fuel and can
    • Maximum stable vapor-layer thickness based on vapor bubble force balance vs centripetal force of liquid fuel
      • Two phase flow dynamics needed to maintain the vapor layer would be complex

This set of options offer a trade-off: either a simpler option, which sets hard limits on the fuel element temperature in order to ensure the phase gradient in the fuel element (the LARS concept), or the fully liquid, more complex-behaving LRC design which has better power distribution, and a higher theoretical fuel element temperature – only limited by the vapor pressure increase and fuel loss rates in the fuel element, rather than the wall heating temperature limits of the LARS design.

Anyone designing a new radiator LNTR has much work that they can draw from, but other than the dynamics of the actual fuel behavior (which have never gone through a criticality test), the fuel element can design will be perhaps the largest set of engineering challenges in this type of system (although simpler than the bubbler-type LNTR).

Propellant Thermalization

The major change between the bubbler and radiator-type LNTRs is the difference in the thermalization behavior of the propellant: in a bubbler-type LNTR, assuming the propellant can be fed through the fuel, the two components reach thermal equilibrium, so the only thing needed is to direct it out of the nozzle; a radiator on the other hand has a similar flow path to the Rover-type NTRs, once through from nozzle to ship side for regenerative cooling, then a final thermalization pass through the central void of the fuel element.

This is a problem for hydrogen propellant, which is largely transparent to the EM radiation coming off the reactor. This thermal transfer accounted for all but 10% of the thermalization effects in the LARS design, and in many of the LRC studies this was completely ignored as negligible, with the convective effects in the propellant mainly being a concern in terms of fuel mass loss and propellant mass increase.

While the fuel mass loss would increase the opacity of the gas (making it absorb more heat), a far better option was available: adding a material in microparticle form to the propellant flow as it goes through the final thermalization cycle. The preferred material for the vast majority of these applications, which we’ll see in the gas cycle NTRs as well, is microparticles of tungsten.

This has been studied in a host of different applications, and will be something that I’ll discuss in depth on a section of the propellant webpage in the future (which I’ll link to here once it’s done), but for the LRC design the target goal for increasing the opacity of the H2 was to achieve between 10,000 and 20,000 cm^2/gm, for a reduction in single-digit percentage of specific impulse due to the higher mass. They pointed out that the simplified calculations used for the fuel mass loss behavior could lead to an error that they were unable to properly address, and which could either increase or decrease the amount of additive used.

The LARS concept used tungsten microparticles as well, and their absorption actually was the defining factor in the two designs they proposed: the emissivity and reflectivity of the fuel in terms of the absorption of the wall and the propellant.

Two other options are available for increasing the opacity of the hydrogen gas.

The first is to use a metal vapor deliberately, as was the paradigm in Soviet gas core design. Here, they used either NaK or Li vapor, both of which have small neutron absorption cross-sections and high thermal capacity. This has the advantage of being more easily mixed with the turbulent propellant stream, as well as being far lower mass than the W that is often used in US designs, but may be less opaque to the EM frequencies being emitted by the fuel’s surface in an LNTR design. I’m still trying to track down a more thorough writeup of the use of these vapors in NTR design at the moment (a common problem in both Soviet and Russian astronuclear literature is a lack of translations), but when I do I’ll discuss it in far more depth, since it’s an idea that doesn’t seem to have translated into the American NTR design paradigm.

As I said, this is a concept that I’m going to cover more in depth in both the gas core and general propellant pages, so with one final – and fascinating – note, we’ll move on to the conclusion.

An Interesting Proposal

The final option is something that Cavan Stone mentioned to me on Facebook a while ago: the use of lithium deuteride (LiD) as a propellant or additive in this design. This is an interesting concept, since Li7 is a fissile material, and is reasonably opaque to the frequencies being discussed in these reactors. The use of deuterium rather than protium also increases the neutron moderation of the propellant, which can in turn increase fissile efficiency of the reactor. The Li will harden the neutron spectrum overall, while the D and Be (in the fuel element can/reactor body) will thermalize the spectrum.

There was a discussion of using LiD as a propellant in NTRs in the 1960s [https://www.osti.gov/biblio/4764043-nuclear-effect-using-lithium-hydride-propellant-nuclear-rocket-reactor-thesis], but sadly I can’t find it anywhere online. If someone is able to help me find it, please let me know. This is a fascinating concept, and one that I’m very glad Cavan brought up to me, but also one that is complex enough that I really need to see an in-depth study by someone far more knowledgeable than me to be able to intelligently discuss the implications of.

Conclusion, or The Future of the Forgotten Reactor

While often referenced in passing in any general presentation on nuclear thermal rockets, the liquid core NTR seems to be the least studied of the different NTR types, and also the least covered. While the bubbler offers distinct advantages from a purely thermodynamic point of view, the radiator offers far more promise from a functional perspective.

Sadly, while both solid and gas core NTRs have been studied into the 20th century, the liquid core has been largely forgotten, and the radiator in particular seems to have gone through a reinvention of the wheel, as it were, between the 1960s NASA design and the 1990s DOE design, with few of the lessons learned from the LRC concept being applied to the BNL design as far as vapor dynamics, thermal transfer, and the like.

This doesn’t mean that the design is without promise, though, or that the challenges that the reactor faces are insurmountable. A number of hurdles in testing need to be overcome for this design to work – but many of the problems that there simply isn’t any data for can be solved with a simple set of criticality and reactor physics tests, something well within the capabilities of most research nuclear programs with the capability to test NTRs.

With the advances in nuclear and two-phase flow modeling, a body of research that doesn’t seem to have been examined in depth for over two decades, and the possibility of a high-isp, moderate-to-high thrust engine without the complications of a gas core NTR (a subject that we’ll be covering soon), the LNTR, and the radiator in particular, offer a combination of promise and ability to develop advanced NTRs as low hanging fruit that few systems are able to offer.

Final Note

With that, we’re leaving the realm of liquid fueled NTRs for now. This is a fascinating field, and one that I haven’t seen much discussion of outside the original technical papers, so I hope you enjoyed it! I’m going to work on getting these posts into a more easily-referenced form on the website proper, and will make a note of that in my blog (and on my social media) when I do! If anyone is aware of any additional references pertaining to the LNTR, as well as its thermophysical behavior, fuel materials options, or anything else relating to these desgins, please let me know, either in the comments or by sending me a message to beyondnerva at gmail dot com.

Our next blog post will be on droplet and vapor core NTRs, and will be covered by a good friend of mine and fellow astronuclear enthusiast: Calixto Lopez. These reactors have fascinated him since he was in school many moons ago, and he’s taught me the majority of what I know about them, so I asked him if he was willing to write that post.

After that, we’re going to move on to the closed cycle gas core NTR, which I’ve already begun research on. There’s lots of fascinating tidbits about this reactor type that I’ve already uncovered, so this may end up being another multiple part blog series.

Finally, to wrap up our discussion of advanced NTRs, we’re going to do a series on the open cycle gas core NTR types. This is going to be a long, complex series on not only the basic physics challenges, but the design evolution of the engine type, as well as discussion on various engineering methods to mitigate the major fuel loss and energy waste issues involved in this type of engine. There may be a delay between the closed and open cycle NTR posts due to the sheer amount of research necessary to do open cycles justice, but rest assured I’m already doing research on them.

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References

General References

ANALYSES OF VAPORIZATION IN LIQUID URANIUM BEARING SYSTEMS AT VERY HIGH TEMPERATURES, Kaufman and Peters 1965 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19660002967.pdf

ANALYSIS OF VAPORIZATION OF LIQUID URANIUM, METAL, AND CARBON SYSTEMS AT 9000” AND 10,000” R Kaufman and Peters 1966 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19660025363.pdf

Fundamental Material Limitations in Heat-Exchanger Nuclear Rockets, Kane and Wells, Jr. 1965 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4610034/

VAPOR-PRESSURE DATA EXTRAPOLATED TO 1000 ATMOSPHERES (1.01~108 N/m2) FOR 13 REFRACTORY MATERIALS WITH LOW THERMAL ABSORPTION CROSS SECTIONS Masser 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670030361.pdf

Radiator-Specific LNTR References

Lewis Research Center LNTR

PERFORMANCE POTENTIAL OF A RADIANT-HEAT-TRANSFER LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE, Ragsdale 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670030774.pdf

HEAT- AND MASS-TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF AN AXIAL-FLOW LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET EMPLOYING RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER, Ragsdale et al 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670024548.pdf

FEASIBILITY OF SUPPORTING LIQUID FUEL ON A SOLID WALL IN A RADIATING LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET CONCEPT, Putre and Kasack 1968 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19680007624.pdf

Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS)

[Paywall] Conceptual Design of a LARS Based Propulsion System, Ludewig et al 1991 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.1991-3515

The Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS) Propulsion, Powell et al 1991 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19910012832.pdf

LIQUID ANNULUS, Ludewig 1992 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19920001886.pdf

[Paywall] The liquid annular reactor system (LARS) for deep space exploration, Maise et al 1999 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0094576599000442

Categories
Development and Testing Forgotten Reactors Nuclear Thermal Systems

The Bubbler: Liquid NTRs Without Barriers

Hello, and welcome back to Beyond NERVA! Today, we continue our look at liquid fueled nuclear thermal rockets (LNTRs), with a deep dive into the first of the two main types: what I call the bubbler LNTR.

This potentially attractive form of advanced NTR is a design that has been largely forgotten in the history of NTR designs outside some minor footnotes. Because of this, I felt that it was a great subject for the blog! All of the sources that I can find on the designs are linked at the end of this post, including a couple that are not available digitally, so if you’re interested in a more technical analysis of the concept please check that out!

What is a Bubbler LNTR?

Every NTR has to heat the (usually hydrogen) propellant in some way, which is usually done through (usually thermal) radiation from the fuel’s surface into the propellant.

Bubbles passing through fuel, Nelson 1963

This design, though, changes that paradigm by passing the propellant through the liquid fuel (usually a mix of uranium carbide (UC2) and some other carbide – either zirconium (ZrC) or niobium (NbC). This is done by having a porous outer wall which the propellant is injected through. This is known as a “folded flow propellant path,” and is seen in other NTRs as well, notably the Dumbo reactor from the early days of Project Rover.

In order to keep the fuel in place, each fuel element is spun at a high enough rate to keep the fuel in place using centrifugal force. The number of fuel elements is one of the design choices that varies from design to design, and the overall diameter, as well as the thickness of the fuel layer, is a matter of some design flexibility as well, but on average the individual fuel elements range from about 2 to about 6 inches in diameter, with the ratio between the thickness of the fuel layer and the thickness of the central void where the now-hot propellant passes through to the nozzle being roughly 1:1.

This was the first type of LNTR to be proposed, and was a subject of study for over a decade, but seems to have fallen out of favor with NTR designers in the late 1960s/early 1970s due to fuel/propellant interaction complications and engineering challenges related to the physical structures for injecting the propellant (more on that later).

Let’s look at the history of bubbler LNTR in more depth, and see how the proposals have evolved over time.

History of the Bubbler-type LNTR: The First of its Kind

McCarthy, 1954

Image from Barrett, Jr 1964

The first proposal for a liquid fueled NTR was in 1954, by J McCarthy in “Nuclear Reactors for Rockets” [ed. Note I have been unable to locate this report in digital form, if anyone is able to help me get ahold of it I would greatly appreciate your assistance; the following summary is based on references to this study in later works]: This design was the first to suggest the centrifugal containment of liquid fuel, and was also the first of the bubbler designs. It used a single fuel element as the entire reactor, with a large central void in the center of the fuel body as the propellant flow channel once it left the fuel itself.

This design was fundamentally limited by three factors:

  1. A torus is a terrible neutronic structure, and while the hydrogen propellant in the central void of the fuel would provide some neutron moderation, McCarthy found upon running the MCNP calculations that the difference was so negligible that it could be assumed to be a vacuum; and
  2. Only a certain amount of heat could be removed from the fuel by the propellant based on assumed fuel element geometry, and that cooling the reactor could pose a major challenge at higher reactor powers; and
  3. The behavior of the hydrogen as it passes through, and also out of, the liquid fuel was not well understood in practice, and
  4. the vapor pressure of the fuel’s constituent components could lead to fuel being absorbed in the gas as vapor in both the bubbles and exhausting propellant flow, causing both a loss of specific impulse and fissile fuel. This process is called “entrainment,” and is a (if not the) major issue for this type of reactor.

However, despite these problems this design jump started the design of LNTRs, defined the beginnings of the design envelope for this type of engine, and introduced the concept of the bubbler LNTR for the first time.

The Princeton LNTR, 1963

Princeton LNTR, Nelson et al 1963

The next major design step was undertaken by Nelson et al at Princeton’s Dept. of Aeronautical Engineering in 1963, under contract by NASA. This was a far more in-depth study than the proposal by McCarthy, and looked to address many of the challenges that the original design faced.

Perhaps the most notable change was the shift from a single large fuel element to multiple smaller ones, arranged in a hexagonal matrix for maximum fuel element packing. This does a couple of things:

  1. It homogenizes the reactor more. While heterogeneous (mixed-region) reactors work well, for a variety of reasons it’s beneficial to have a more consistent distribution of materials through the core – mainly for neutronic properties and ease of modeling (this is 1963, MCNP in a heterogeneous core using a slide rule sounds… agonizing).
  2. Given a materially limited, fixed specific impulse (see the Fuel Materials Constraints section for more in-depth discussion on this) NTR, the thrust is proportional to the total surface area of the fuel/propellant interface. By using multiple fuel elements (which they call vortices), the total available surface area increases in the same volume, increasing the thrust without compromising isp (this also implies a greater specific power, another good thing in an NTR).

This was a thermal (0.37 eV) neutron spectrum reactor, fueled by a mix of UC2 and ZrC, varying the dilution level for greater moderation and increased thermal limits. It was surrounded by a 21 cm reflector of beryllium (a “standard reflector”).

From there, the basic geometry of the reactor, from the number of fuel elements and their fueled thickness, to the core diameter and volume (the length was at a fixed ratio compared to the radius), to the shape, velocity, and number of bubbles (as well as vapor entrainment losses of the fuel material) were studied.

This was a fairly limited study, despite its length, due to the limitations of the resources available. Transients and reactor kinetics were specifically excluded from this study, the hydrogen was again replaced with vacuum in calculations, the temperature was assumed to be higher than possible due to vapor entrainment problems (4300 K, instead of 3600 K at 10 atm, 3800 at 30 atm) the chamber pressure was limited to only >1 atm, and age-diffusion theory calculations only give results within an order of magnitude… but it’s still one of the most thorough study of LNTRs I’ve found, and the most researched bubbler architecture. They pointed out the potential benefits of the use of 233U, or a larger but neutronically equivalent volume of 232Th (turning the reactor into a thermal breeder), in order to improve the overall vaporization characteristics, but this was not included in the study.

Barrett LNTR, 1964

The next year, W. Louis Barrett presented a variation of the Princeton LNTR at the AIAA Conference. The main distinction between the two designs was the addition of zirconium hydride in the areas between the fuel elements and the outer reflector, and presented the first results from a study being conducted on the bubble behavior in the fuel (being conducted at Princeton at the time). The UC2/ZrC fuel was the same, as were the number of fuel elements and reactor dimensions. The author concluded that a specific impulse of 1500-1550 seconds was possible, with a T/W of 1 at 100 atm, with thrust not being limited by heat transfer but by available flow area.

Below are the two relevant graphs from his findings: the first is the point at which the fissile fuel itself would end up becoming captured by the passing gas, and the second looks at the maximum specific impulse any particular fissile fuel could theoretically offer. The image for the McCarthy reactor above was from the same paper.

Final Work: Bubbles are Annoying

For this reactor to work, the heat must be adequately transferred from the fuel element to the propellant as it bubbles through the fuel mass radially. The amount of heat that needs to be removed, and the time and distance that it can be removed in, is a function of both the fuel and the bubbles of H2.

Sadly, the most comprehensive study of this has never been digitized, but for anyone who’s able to get documents digitized at Princeton University and would like to help make the mechanics of bubbler-type LNTRs more accessible, here’s the study: Liebherr, J.F., Williams, P.M., and Grey, J., “Bubble Motion Studies for the Liquid Core Nuclear Rocket,” Princeton University Aeronautical Engineering Report No. 673, December 1963. Apparently you can check it out after you can convince the librarians to excavate it, based on their website: https://catalog.princeton.edu/catalog/1534764.

McGuirk 1972

Here, a clear plastic housing was constructed which consisted of two main layers: an outer, solid casing which formed the outer body of the apparatus, and a perforated, inner cylinder, which simulated the fuel element canister. Water was used as the fuel element analog, and the entire apparatus was spun along its long axis to apply centrifugal acceleration to the water at various rotation rates. Pressurized air (again, at various pressures) was used in place of the hydrogen coolant. Stroboscopic photography was used to document bubble size, shape, and behavior, and these behaviors were then used to calculate the potential thermal exchange, vapor entrainment, and other characteristics of the behavior of this system.

One significant finding, based on Gray’s reporting, though, is that there’s a complex relationship between the dimensions, shape, velocity, and transverse momentum of the bubbles and their thermal uptake capacity, as well as their vapor entrainment of fuel element components. However, without being able to read this work, I can only hope someone can make this work accessible to the world at large (and if you’ve got technical knowledge and interest in the subject, and feel like writing about it, let me know: I’m more than happy to have you write a blog post on here on this INSANELY complex topic).

The last reference to a bubbler LNTR I can find is from AIAA’s Engineering Notes from May 1972 by McGuirk and Park, “Propellant Flow Rate through Simulated Liquid-Core Nuclear Rocket Fuel Bed.” This paper brings up a fundamental problem that heretofore had not been addressed in the literature on bubblers, and quite possibly spelled their death knell.

Every study until this point greatly simplified, or ignored, two phase flow thermodynamic interactions. If you’re familiar with thermodynamics, this is… kinda astounding, to be honest. It also leads me to a diversion that could be far longer than the two pages that this report covers, but I won’t indulge myself. In short, two phase flow is used to model the thermal transfer, hydro/gasdynamic properties, and other interactions between (in this case) a liquid and a gas, or a melting or boiling liquid going through a phase change.

This is… a problem, to say the least. Based on the simplified modeling, the fundamental thermal limitation for this sort of reactor was vapor entrainment of the fuel matrix, reducing the specific impulse and changing he proportions of elements in the matrix, causing potential phase change and neutronics complications.

This remains a problem, but is unfortunately not the main thermal limitation of this reactor, rather it was discovered that the amount of thermal rejection available through the bubbling of the propellant through the fuel is not nearly as high as was expected at lower propellant flow rates, and higher flow rates led to splattering of the bubbles bursting, as well as unstable flow in the system. We’ll look at the consequences of this later, but needless to say this was a major hiccup in the development of the bubbler type LNTR.

While there may be further experimentation on the bubbler type LNTR, this paper came out shortly before the cancellation of the vast majority of astronuclear funding in the US, and when research was restarted it appears that the focus had shifted to radiator-type LNTRs, so let’s move on to looking at them.

Bubbler-Specific Constraints

Fuel Element Thickness and Heat Transfer

One of the biggest considerations in a bubbler LNTR is the thickness of the fuel within each fuel canister. The fundamental trade-off is one of mechanical vs thermodynamic requirements: the smaller the internal radius at the fuel element’s interior surface, the higher the angular velocity has to be to maintain sufficient centrifugal force to contain the fuel, btu also the greater time and distance the bubbles are able to collect heat from the fuel.

In the Princeton study, the total volume within the fuel canister was roughly equally divided between fuel and propellant to achieve a comfortable trade-off between fuel mass, reactor volume, and thermal uptake in the propellant. In this case, they included the volume of the propellant as it passed through the fuel to be part of the central annulus’ volume, which eases the neutronic calculations, but also induces a complication in the actual diameter of the central void: as propellant flow increases, the void diameter decreases, requiring more angular momentum to maintain sufficient centrifugal force.

A thinner fuel element, on the other hand, runs into the challenge of requiring a greater volume of propellant to pass through it to remove the same amount of energy, but an overall lower temperature of the propellant that is used. This, in turn, reduces the propellant’s final velocity, resulting in lower specific impulse but higher thrust. However, another problem is that the fluid mixture of the propellant/fuel can only contain so much gas before major problems develop in the behavior of the mixture. In an unpublished memorandum from 1963 (“Some Considerations on the Liquid Core Reactor Concept,” Mar 23), Bussard speculated that the maximum ratio of gas to fuel would be around 0.3 to 0.4; at this point the walls of the bubbles are likely to merge, converting the fuel into a very liquidy droplet core reactor (a concept that we’ll discuss in a future blog post), as well as leading to excess splattering of the fuel into the central void of the fuel element. While some sort of recapture system may be possible to prevent fuel loss, in a classic bubbler LNTR this is an unacceptable situation, and therefore this type of limitation (which may or may not actually be 0.3-0.4, something for future research to examine) intrinsically ties fuel element thickness to maximum propellant flow rates based on volume.

There are some additional limits here, as well, but we’ll discuss those in the next section. While the propellant will gain some additional power through its passage out of the fuel element and toward the nozzle, as in the radiator type LNTR, this will not be as significant as the propellant is entering along the entire length fuel element.

Bubble Dynamics

This is probably the single largest problem that a bubbler faces: the behavior of the bubbles themselves. As this is the primary means of cooling the fuel, as well as thermalizing the propellant, the behavior of these bubbles, and the ability of the propellant stream to control the entirety of the heat generated in the fuel, is of absolutely critical importance. We looked briefly in the last section at the impacts of the thickness of the fuel, but what occurs within that distance is a far more complex topic than it may appear at first glance. With advances in two phase flow modeling (which I’m unable to accurately assess), this problem may not be nearly as daunting as it was when this reactor was being researched, but in all likelihood this set of challenges is perhaps the single largest reason that the bubbler LNTR disappeared from the design literature when it did.

The other effect that the bubbles have on the fuel is that they are the main source of vapor entrainment of fuel element materials in a bubbler, since they are the liquid/gas interface that occurs for the longest, and have the largest relative surface area. We aren’t going to discuss this particular dynamic to any great degree, but the behavior of this interaction compared to inner surface interactions will potentially be significant, both due to the fact that these bubbles are the longest-lived liquid/gas interaction by surface area and are completely encircled by the fuel itself while undergoing heating (and therefore expansion, exacerbated by the decreasing pressure from the centrifugal acceleration gradient). One final note on this behavior: it may be possible that the bubbles may become saturated with vapor during their thermalization, preventing uptake of more material while also increasing the thermal uptake of energy from the fuel (metal vapors were suggested by Soviet NTR designers, including Li and NaK, to deal with the thermal transparency of H2 in advanced NTR designs).

The behavior of the bubbles depends on a number of characteristics:

  1. Size: The smaller the bubble, the greater the surface area to volume ratio, increasing the amount of heat the can be absorbed in a given time relative to the volume, but also the less thermal energy that can be transported by each bubble. The size of the bubbles will increase as they move through the fuel element, gaining energy though heat, and therefore expanding and becoming less dense.
  2. Shape: Partially a function of size, shape can have several impacts on the behavior and usefulness of the bubbles. Only the smallest bubbles (how “small” depends on the fluids under consideration) can retain a spherical shape. The other two main shape classifications of bubbles in the LNTR literature are oblate spheroid and spherical cap. In practice, the higher propellant flow rates result in the largest, spherical cap-type bubbles in the fuel, which complicate both thermal transfer and motion modeling. One consequence of this is that the bubbles tend to have a high Reynolds number, leading to more turbulent behavior as they move through the fuel mass. Most standard two-phase modeling equations at the time had a difficult time adequately predicting the behavior of these sorts of bubbles. Another important consideration is that the bubbles will change shape to a certain degree as they pass through the fuel element, due to the higher temperature and lower centrifugal force being experienced on them as they move into the central void of the fuel element.
  3. Velocity: A function of centrifugal force, viscosity of the fuel, initial injection pressure of the propellant, density of the constituent gas/vapor mix, and other factors, the velocity of a bubble through the fuel element determines how much heat – and vapor – can be absorbed by a bubble of a given size and shape. An increase in velocity also changes the bubble shape, for instance from an oblate spheroid to a spherical cap. One thing to note is that the bubbles don’t move directly along the radius of the fuel element, both oscillation laterally and radially occur as the shape deforms and as centrifugal, convective, and other forces interact with the bubble; whether this effect is significant enough to change the necessary modeling of the system will depend on a number of factors including fuel element thickness, convective and Coriolis behavior in the fuel mass, bubble Reynolds number, and angular velocity of the fuel element,
  4. Distribution: One concern in a bubbler LNTR is ensuring that the bubbles passing through the fuel mass don’t combine into larger conglomerations, or that the density of bubbles results in a lack of overall cohesion in the fuel mass. This means that the distribution system for the bobbles must balance propellant flow rate, bubble size, velocity, and shape, non-vertical behavior of the bubbles, and the overall gas fraction of the fuel element based on the fuel element design being used.

As mentioned previously, the final paper on the bubbler I was able to find looked at the challenges of bubble dynamics in a simulated LNTR fuel element; in this case using water and compressed air. Several compromises had to be made, leading to unpredictable behavior of the propellant stream and the simulated fuel behavior, which could be due to the challenges of using water to simulate ZrC/UC2, including insufficient propellant pressure, bubble behavior irregularities, and other problems. Perhaps the most major challenge faced in this study is that there were three distinct behavioral regimes in the two phase system: orderly (low prop pressure), disordered (medium prop pressure), and violent (high prop pressure), each of which was a function of the relationship between propellant flow and centrifugal force being applied. As suspected, having too high a void fraction within the fuel mass led to splattering, and therefore fuel mass loss rates that were unacceptably high, but the point that this violent disorder occurred was low enough that it was not assured that the propellant might not be able to completely remove all the thermal energy from the fuel element itself. If the energy level of each fuel element is reduced (by reducing the fissile component of the fuel while maintaining a critical mass, for instance), this can be compensated for, but only by losing power density and engine performance. The alternative, increasing the centrifugal force on the system, leads to greater material and mechanical challenges for the system.

Adequately modeling these characteristics was a major challenge at the time these studies were being conducted, and the number of unique circumstances involved in this type of reactor makes realistic modeling remain non-trivial; advances in both computational and modeling techniques make this set of challenges more accessible than in the 1960s and 70s, though, which may make this sort of LNTR more feasible than it once was, and restarting interest in this unique architecture.

These constraints define many things in a bubbler LNTR, as they form the single largest thermodynamic constraint on the engine. Increasing centrifugal force increases the stringency for both the fuel element canister (with incorporated propellant distribution system), mechanical systems to maintain angular velocity for fuel containment, maximum thrust and isp for a given design, and other considerations.

Suffice to say, until the bubble behavior, and its interactions with the fuel mass, can be adequately modeled and balanced, the bubbler LNTR would require significant basic empirical testing to be able to be developed, and this limitation was probably a significant contributor to the reason that it hasn’t been re-examined since the early-to-mid 1970s.

The “Restart Problem”

The last major issue in a bubbler-type design is the “restart problem”: when the reactor is powered down, there will be a period of time when the fuel is still molten, requiring centrifugal containment, but the reactor being powered down allows for the fuel to be pressed into the pores of the fuel element canister, blocking the propellant passages.

One potential solution for the single fuel element design was proposed by L. Crocco, who suggested that the fuel material is used for the bubbling structure itself. When powered up, the fuel would be completely solid, and would radiate heat in all directions until the fuel becomes molten [ed. Note: according to Crocco, this would occur from the inner surface to the outer one, but I can’t find backup for that assumption of edge power peaking behavior, or how it would translate to a multi-fuel-element design], and propellant would be able to pass through the inner layers of the fuel element once the liquid/solid interface reached the pre-drilled propellant channels in the fuel element.

Another would be to continue to pass the hydrogen propellant through the fuel element until the pressure to continue pumping the H2 reaches a certain threshold pressure, then use a relief valve to vent the system elsewhere while continuing to reject the final waste heat until a suitable wall temperature has been reached. This is going to both make the fuel element less dense, and also result in a lower fuel element density near the wall than at the inner surface of the fuel element. While this could maybe [ed. Note: speculation on my part] make it so that the fuel is more likely to melt from the inner surface to the outer one, the trapped H2 may also be just enough to cause power peaking around the bubbles, allow chemical reactions to occur during startup with unknown consequences, and other complications that I couldn’t even begin to guess at – but the tubes would be kept clear.

Wall Material Constraints

Other than the “restart problem,” additional constraints apply to the wall material. It needs to be able to handle the rotational stresses of the spinning fuel element, be permeable to the propellant, and able to withstand rather extreme thermal gradients: on one side, gaseous hydrogen at near-cryogenic temperatures (the propellant would have already absorbed some heat from the reactor body) to about 6000 K on the inside, where it comes in contact with the molten fuel.

Also, the bearings holding the fuel element will need to be designed with care. Not only do they need to handle the rather large amount of thermal expansion that will occur in all directions during reactor startup, they have to be able to deal with high rotation rates throughout the temperature range.

The Paths Not (Yet?) Taken

Perhaps due to the early time period in which the LNTR was explored, a number of design options don’t seem to have been explored in this sort of reactor.

One option is neutron moderator. Due to the high thermal gradients in this reactor, ZrH and other thermally sensitive moderators could be used to further thermalize the neutron spectrum. While this might not be explicitly required, it may help reduce the fissile requirements of the reactor, and would not be likely to significantly increase reactor mass.

A host of other options are possible as well, if you can think of one, comment below!

Diffuser LNTR

The other option was brought up by Michael Turner at Project Persephone, in regards to the vapor entrainment and restart problem issues: what if you get rid of the holes in the walls of the fuel element, and the bubbles through the fuel element, altogether? As we saw when discussing Project Rover, hydrogen gets through EVERYTHING, especially hot metals. This diffusion process is done through individual molecules, not through bubbles, meaning that the possibility of vapor entrainment is eliminated. The down side is that the propellant mass flow will be extremely reduced, resulting in a higher-isp (due to the ability to increase fuel temp because the vapor losses are minimized), much-lower-thrust reactor than those designed before. As he points out, this may be able to be mixed with bubbles for a high-thrust, lower-isp mode, if “shutters” on the fuel element outer frit were able to be engineered. Another possible requirement would be to reduce the fissile component density of the fuel to match the power output to the hydrogen flow rates, or to create a hybrid diffuser/radiator LNTR to balance the propellant flow and thermal output of the reactor.

I have not been able to calculate if this would be feasible or not, and am reasonably skeptical, but found it an intriguing possibility.

Conclusion

The bubbler liquid nuclear thermal rocket is a fascinating concept which has not been explored nearly as much as many other advanced NTR designs. The advantage of being able to fully thermalize the propellant to the highest fuel element temperature while maintaining cryogenic temperatures outside the fuel element is a rarity in NTR design, and offers many options for structures outside the fuel elements themselves. After over a decade of research at Princeton (and other centers), the basic research on the dynamics of this type of reactor has been established, and with the computational and modeling capabilities that were unavailable at the time of these studies, new and promising versions of this concept may come to light if anyone chooses to study the design.

The problems of vapor entrainment, fissile fuel loss, and restarting the reactor are significant, however, and impact many area of the reactor design which have not been addressed in previous studies. Nevertheless, the possibility remains that this drive may one day indeed make a useful stepping stone from the solid-fueled NTRs of tomorrow to the advanced NTRs of the decades ahead.

References

A Technical Report on the CONCEPTUAL DESIGN – STUDY OF A LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET, Nelson et al 1963 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19650026954.pdf

The Liquid Core Nuclear Rocket, Grey 1965 (pg 92) https://permalink.lanl.gov/object/tr?what=info:lanl-repo/lareport/LA-03229-MS

Specific Impulse of a Liquid Core Nuclear Rocket, Barrett Jr 1963 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/3.2141?journalCode=aiaaj

Propellant Flow Rate through Simulated Liquid-Core Nuclear Rocket Fuel Bed, McGuirk and Park 1972 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/3.61690?journalCode=jsr

Categories
Development and Testing Forgotten Reactors History Nuclear Thermal Systems

Liquid Fueled NTRs: An Introduction

Hello, and welcome back to Beyond NERVA! Today we continue our look into advanced NTR fuel types, by diving into an extended look at one of the least covered design types in this field: the liquid fueled NTR (LNTR).

This is a complex field, with many challenges unique to the phase state of the fuel, so while I was planning on making this a single-part series, now there’s three posts! This first one is going to discuss LNTRs in general, as well as some common problems and challenges that they face. I’ll include a very brief history of the designs, almost all of them dating from the 1950s and 1960s, which we’ll look at more in depth in the next couple posts.

Unfortunately, a lot of the fundamental problems of an LNTR get deep – fast, for a lot of people, but the fundamental concepts are often not too hard to get in the broad strokes. I’m gonna try my best to explain them the way that I learned them, and if there’s more questions I’ll attempt to point you to the references I’ve used as a layperson, but I honestly believe that this architecture has suffered from a combination of being “not terrible, not great” in terms of engine performance (1300 s isp, 19/1 T/W).

With that, let’s get into liquid fueled NTRs (LNTR), their history, and their design!

Basic Design Options for LNTR

LNTRs are not a very diverse group of reactor concepts, partially due to the nature of the fuel and partially because they haven’t been well-researched overall. All designs I’ve found use centrifugal force to contain molten fuel inside a tube, with the central void in the spinning tube being the outlet point for the propellant. The first design used a single, large fuel mass in a single fuel element, but quickly this was divided into multiple individual fuel elements, which became the norm for LNTR through the latest designs. One consequence of this first design was the calculation of the neutronic moderation capacity of the H2 propellant in this toroidal fuel structure, and the authors of the study determined that it was so close to zero that it was worth it to consider the center of the fuel element to be a vacuum as far as MCNP (the standard neutronic modeling code both at the time, and in updated form now) is concerned. This is something worth noting: any significant neutron moderation for the core must come from the reflectors and moderator either integrated into the fuel structure (complex to do in a liquid in many cases) or the body of the reactor, the propellant flow won’t matter enough to cause a significant decrease in neutron velocities.

They do seem to fall into two broad categories, which I’ll call bubblers and radiators. A bubbler LNTR is one where the fuel is fed from the outside of the fuel element, through the molten fuel, and into the central void of the fuel element; a radiator LNTR passes propellant only through the central void along the long axis of the fuel element.

A bubbler has the advantage that it is able to use an incredible amount of surface area for heat transfer from the fuel to the propellant, with the surface area being inversely proportional to the size of the individual bubbles: smaller bubbles, more surface area, more heat transfer, greater theoretical power density in the active region of the reactor. They also have the advantage of being able to regeneratively cool the entire length of the fuel element’s outside surface as a natural consequence of the way the propellant is fed into the fuel, rather than using specialized regenerative cooling systems in the fuel element canister and reactor body. However, bubblers also have a couple problems: first, the reactor will not be operating continuously, so on shutdown the fuel will solidify, and the bubbling mechnaism will become clogged with frozen nuclear fuel; second, the breaching of the bubbles to the surface can fling molten fuel into the fast-moving propellant stream, causing fuel to be lost; finally, the bubbles increase mixing of the fuel, which is mostly good but can also lead to certain chemical components of the fuel being carried at a greater rate by either vaporizing and being absorbed into the bubbles or becoming entrained in the fuel and outgassing when the bubble breaches the surface. In a way, it’s sort of like boiling pasta sauce: the water boils, and the bubbles mix the sauce while they move up, but some chemical compounds diffuse into the water vapor along the way (which ones depend on what’s in the sauce), and unless there’s a lid on the pot the sauce splatters across the stove, again depending on the other components of the sauce that you’re cooking. (the obvious problem with this metaphor is that, rather than the gaseous component being a part of the initial solution they’re externally introduced)/

Radiators avoid many of the problems of a bubbler, but not all, by treating the fuel almost like a solid mass when its under centrifugal force: the propellant enters from the ship end, through the central void in the fuel element, and then out the aft end to enter the nozzle through an outlet plenum. This makes fuel retention a far simpler problem overall, but fuel will still be lost through vaporization into the propellant stream (more on this later). Another issue with radiators is that without the propellant passing all the way through the fuel from the outer to inner diameter, the thermal emissions will not only go into the propellant, but also into the fuel canister and the reactor itself – more efficiently, actually, since H2 isn’t especially good at capturing heat,k and conduction is more efficient than radiation. This requires regenerative cooling both for the fuel canister and the reactor as well most of the time – which while doable also requires a more complex plumbing setup within the reactor body to maintain material thermal limits on even relatively high temperature materials, much less hydrides (which are good low-volume, low-mass moderators for compact reactors, but incredibly thermally sensitive).

As with any other astronuclear design, there’s a huge design envelope to play with in terms of fuel matrix, even in liquid form (although this is more limited in liquid designs, as we’ll see), as well as moderation level, number and size of fuel elements, moderator type, and other decisions. However, the vast majority of the designs have been iterative concepts on the same basic two ideas, with modifications mostly focusing on fuel element dimensions and number, fuel temperature, propellant flow rates, and individual fuel matrix materials rather than entirely different reactor architectures.

It’s worth noting that there’s another concept, the droplet core NTR, which diffuses the liquid fuel into the propellant, then recaptures it using (usually) centrifugal force before the droplets can leave the nozzle, but this is a concept that will be covered alongside the vapor core reactor, since it’s a hybrid of the two concepts.

A (Very) Brief History of LNTR

Because we’re going to be discussing the design evolution of each type of LNTR in depth in the next two posts, I’m going to be incredibly brief here, giving a general overview of the history of LNTRs. While they’re often mentioned as an intermediate-stage NTR option, there’s been a surprisingly small amount of research done on them, with only two programs of any significant size being conducted in the 1960s.

Single cavity LNTR, Barrett 1963

The first proposal for an LNTR was by J. McCarthy in 1954, in his “Nuclear Reactors for Rockets.” This design used a single, large cylinder, spun around the long axis, as both the reactor and fuel element. The fuel was fed into the void in the cylinder radially, bubbling through the fuel mass, which was made of uranium carbide (UC2). This design, as any first design, had a number of problems, but showed sufficient promise for the design to be re-examined, tweaked, and further researched to make it more practical. While I don’t have access to this paper, a subsequent study of the design placed the maximum specific impulse of this type of NTR in the range of 1200-1400 seconds.

Multiple Fuel Element LNTR, Nelson et al 1963

This led to the first significant research program into the LNTR, carried out by Nelson et al at the Princeton Aeronautical Engineering Laboratory in 1963. This design changed the single large rotating cylinder into several smaller ones, each rotating independently, while keeping the same bubbler architecture of the McCarthy design. This ended up improving the thrust to weight ratio, specific impulse, power density, and other key characteristics. The study also enumerated many of the challenges of both the LNTR in general, and the bubbler in specific, for the first time in a detailed and systematic fashion, but between the lack of information on the materials involved, as well as lack of both computational theory and modeling capability, this study was hampered by many assumptions of convenience. Despite these challenges (which would continue to be addressed over time in smaller studies and other designs), the Princeton LNTR became the benchmark for most LNTR designs of both types that followed. The final design chosen by the team has a vacuum specific impulse of 1250 s, a chamber pressure of 10 atm, and a thrust-to-weight ratio of about 2:1, with a reactor mass of approximately 100 metric tons.

Experimental setup for bublle behavior studies, Barrett Jr 1963

Studies on the technical details of the most challenging aspect of this design, that of bubble motion, would continue at Princeton for a number of years, including experiments to observe the behavior of the particular bubble form needed while under centrifugal acceleration, but challenges in modeling the two-phase (liquid/gas) interactions for thermodynamics and hydrodynamics continued to dog the bubbler design. It is unclear when work stopper on the bubbler design, but the last reference to it that I can find in the literature was from 1972, in a published Engineering Note by W.L. Barrett, who observed that many of the hoped-for goals were overly optimistic, but not by a huge margin. This is during the time that American astronuclear funding was being demolished, and so it would not be surprising that the concept would go into dormancy at that point. Since the restarting of modest astronuclear funding, though, I have been unable to find any reference to a modern bubbler design for either terrestrial or astronuclear use.

Perhaps the main reason for this, which we’ll discuss in the next section, is the inconveniently high vapor pressure of many compounds when operating in the temperature range of an LNTR (about 8800 K). This means that the constituent parts of the fuel body, most notably the uranium, would vaporize into the propellant, not only removing fissile material from the reactor but significantly increasing the mass of the propellant stream, decreasing specific impulse. This, in fact, was the reason the Lewis Research Center focused on a different form of LNTR: the radiator.

Work on the radiator concept began in 1964, and was conducted by a team headed by R Ragsdale, one of the leading NTR designers ar Lewis Research Center. To mitigate the vapor losses of the bubbler type, the question was asked if the propellant actually had to pass through the fuel, or if radiant heating would suffice to thermalize the hydrogen propellant while minimizing the fuel loss from the liquid/gas interaction zone. The answer was a definite yes, although the fuel temperature would have to be higher, and the propellant would likely need to be seeded with some particulate or vapor to increase its thermal absorption. While the overall efficiency would be slightly lower, only a minimal loss of specific impulse would occur, and the thrust to weight ratio could be increased due to higher propellant flow (only so much propellant can pass through a given volume of bubbler-type fuel before unacceptable splattering and other difficulties would arise). This seems to have reached its conclusion in 1967, the last date that any of the papers or reports that I’ve been able to find, with a final compromise design achieving 1400 s of isp, a thrust-to-core-weight-ratio of 4:1, at a core temperature of 5060 K and a reactor pressure of 200 atm (2020 N/m^2).

However, unlike with the bubbler-type LNTR, the radiator would have one last, minor hurrah. In the 1990s, at the beginning of the Space Exploration Initiative, funding became available again for NTR development. A large conference was held in 1991, in Albuquerque, NM, and served as a combination state-of-research and idea presentation for what direction NTR development should go in, as well as determining which concepts should be explored more in depth. As part of this, presentations were made on many different fundamental reactor architectures, and proposals for each type of NTR were made. While the bubbler LNTR was not represented, the radiator was.

LARS cross-section, Powell 1991

This concept, presented by J Powell of Brookhaven National Lab, was the Liquid Annular Reactor System. Compared to the Lewis and Princeton designs, it was a simple reactor, with only seven fuel elements, These would be spaced in a cylinder of Be/H moderator, and would use a twice-through coolant/propellant system: each cylinder was regeneratively cooled from nozzle-end to ship-end, and then the propellant, seeded with W microparticles, would then pass through the central void and out the nozzle. Interestingly enough, this design did not seem to reference the work done by either Princeton or Lewis RC, so there’s a possibility that this was a new design from first principles (other designs presented at the conference made extensive use of legacy data and modeling). This reactor was only conceptually sketched out in the documentation I’ve found, operated at higher temperatures (~6000 K) and lower pressures (~10 atm) than the previous designs to dissociate virtually all of the hydrogen propellant, and no estimated thrust-to-core-weight ratios.

It is unclear how much work was done on this reactor design, and it also remains the last design of any LNTR type that I’ve been able to come across.

Lessons from History: Considerations for LNTR Design

Having looked through the history of LNTR design, it’s worth looking at the lessons that have been learned from these design studies and experiments, as well as the reasons (as far as we can tell) that the designs have evolved the way they did. I just want to say up front that I’m going to be especially careful about when I use my own interpretation, compared to a more qualified someone else’s interpretation, on the constraints and design philosophies here, because this is an area that runs into SO MANY different materials, neutronics, etc constraints that I don’t even know where to begin independently assessing the advantages and disadvantages.

Also, we’re going to be focusing on the lessons that (mostly) apply to both the bubbler and radiator concepts. The following posts, covering the types individually, will address the specific challenges of the two types of LNTR.

Reactor Architecture

The number of fuel elements in an LNTR is a trade-off.

  • Advantages to increasing the number of fuel elements
    • The total surface area available in the fuel/propellant boundary increases, increasing thrust for a given specific impulse
    • The core becomes more homogeneous, making a more idealized neutronic environment (there’s a limit to this, including using interstitial moderating blocks between the fuel elements to further thermalize the reactor, but is a good rule of thumb in most cases)
  • Advantages to minimizing the number of fuel elements
    • The more fuel elements, the more manufacturing headache in making the fuel element canisters and elements themselves, as well as the support equipment for maintaining the rotation of the fuel elements;
      • depending on the complexity of the manufacturing process, this could be a significant hurdle,
      • Electronic motors don’t do well in a high neutron flux, generally requiring driveshaft penetration of at least part of the shadow shield, and turbines to drive the system can be so complex that this is often not considered an option in NTRs (to be fair, it’s rare that they would be needed)
    • The less angular velocity is needed for each fuel element to have the same centrifugal force, due to the larger radius of the fuel element
    • For a variety of reasons the fuel thickness increases to maintain the same critical mass in the reactor – NOTE: this is a benefit for bubbler-type LNTRs, but either neutral or detrimental to streamer-type NTRs.

Another major area of trade-off is propellant mass flow rates. These are fundamentally limited in bubbler LNTRs (something we’ll discuss in the next post), since the bubbles can’t be allowed to combine (or splattering and free droplets will occur), the more bubbles the more the fuel expands (causing headaches for fuel containment), and other issues will present themselves. On the other hand, for radiator – and to a lesser extent the bubbler – type LNTRs, the major limitation is thermal uptake in the propellant (too much mass flow means that the exhaust velocity will drop), which can be somewhat addressed by propellant seeding (something that we’ll discuss in a future webpage).

Fuel Material Constraints

One fundamental question for any LNTR fuel is the maximum theoretical isp of a design, which is a direct function of the critical temperature (when the fuel boils) and at what rate the fuel would vaporize from where the fuel and propellant interact. Pretty much every material has a range of temperature and pressure values where either sublimation (in a solid) or vaporization (in a liquid) will occur, and these characteristics were not well understood at the time.

This is actually one of the major tradeoffs in bubbler vs radiator designs. In a bubbler, you get the propellant and the maximum fuel temperature to be the same, but you also effectively saturate the fuel with any available vapor. The actual vapor concentrations are… well, as far as I can tell, it’s only ever been modeled with 1960s methods, and those interactions are far beyond what I’m either qualified or comfortable to assess, but I suspect that while the problem may be able to be slightly mitigated it won’t be able to be completely avoided.

However, there are general constraints on the fuels available for use, and the choice of every LNTR has been UC2, usually with a majority of the fuel mass being either ZrC or NbC as the dilutent. Other options are available, potentially, such as 184W-U or U-Si metals, but they have not been explored in depth.

Let’s look at the vapor pressure implications more in depth, since it really is the central limitation of LNTR fuels at temperatures that are reasonable for these rockets.

Vapor Pressure Implications

A study on the vapor pressure of uranium was conducted in 1953 by Rauh et al at Argonne NL, which determined an approximate function of the vapor pressure of “pure” uranium metal (some discussion about the inhibiting effects of oxygen, which would not be present in an NTR to any great degree, and also tantalum contamination of the uranium, were needed based on the experimental setup), but this was based on solid U, so was only useful as a starting point.

Barrett Jr 1963

W Louis Barret Jr. conducted another study in 1963 on the implications of fuel composition for a bubbler-type LNTR, and the constraints on the potential specific impulse of this type of reactor. The author examined many different fissile fuel matrices in their paper, including Pu and Th compounds:

From this, and assuming a propellant pressure of 10^3 psi, a maximum theoretical isp was calculated for each type of fuel:

Barrett Jr 1963

Additional studies were carried out on uranium metal and carbon compounds – mostly Zr-C-U, Nb-C-U and 184W-C-U, in various concentrations – in 1965 and 66 by Kaufman and Peters of MANLABS for NASA Lewis Research Center (the center of LNTR development at the time), conducted at 100 atmospheres and ~4500 to ~5500 K. These were low atomic mass fraction systems (0.001-0.02), which may be too low for some designs, but will minimize fissile fuel loss to the propellant flow. Other candidate materials considered were Mo-C-U, B-C-U, and Me-C-U, but not studied at the time.

A summary of the results can be found below:

Perhaps the most significant question is mass loss rates due to hydrogen transport, which can be found in this table:

Kaufman, 1966

These values offer a good starting point for those that want to explore the maximum operating temperature of this type of reactor, but additional options may exist. For instance, a high vapor pressure, high boiling point, low neutron absorption metal which will mix minimally with the uranium-bearing fuel could be used as a liquid fuel clad layer, either in a persistent form (meant to survive the lifetime of the fuel element) or as a sacrificial vaporization layer similar to how ablative coatings are used in some rocket nozzles (one note here: this will increase the atomic mass of the propellant stream, decreasing the specific impulse of such a design). However, other than the use of ZrC in the Princeton design study in the inner region of that fuel element design (which was also considered a sacrificial component of the fuel), I haven’t seen anyone discuss this concept in depth in the literature.

A good place to start investigating this concept, however, would be with a study done by Charles Masser in 1967 entitled “Vapor-Pressure Data Extrapolated to 1000 Atmospheres of 13 Refractory Materials with Low Thermal Absorption Cross Sections.” While this was focused on the seeding of propellant with microparticles to increase thermal absorption in colder H2, the vapor-pressure information can provide a good jumping off point for anyone interested in investigating this subject further. The paper can be found here: https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670030361.pdf.

Author speculation concept:

Another, far more speculative option is available if the LNTR can be designed as a thermal breeder, and dealing with certain challenges in fuel worth fluctuations (and other headaches), especially at startup: thorium. This is because Th has a much lower vapor pressure than U does (although the vapor pressure behavior of carbides in a high temperature, high pressure situation doesn’t seem to have been studied ThO2 and ThO3 outperform UC2 – but oxides are a far worse idea than carbides in this sort of reactor), so it may be possible to make a Th-breeder LNTR to reduce fissile fuel vapor losses – which does nothing for C, or Zr/Nb, but may be worth it.

This requires a couple things to happen: first, the reactor’s available reactivity needs to be able to remain within the control authority of the control systems in a far more complex system, and the breeding ratio of the reactor needs to be carefully managed. There’s a few reasons for this, but let’s look at the general shape of the challenge.

Many LNTR designs are either fast or epithermal designs, with few extending into the thermal neutron spectrum. Thorium breeds into 233U best in the thermal neutron spectrum, so the neutron flux needs to be balanced against the Th present in the reactor in order to make sure that the proper breeding ratio is maintained. This can be adjusted by adding moderator blocks between the fuel elements, using other filler materials, and other options common to NTR neutronics design, but isn’t something that I’ve seen addressed anywhere.

Let’s briefly look at the breeding process: when 232Th is bred into 233U, it goes through a two-week period where the nucleus undergoing the breeding process ends up existing as 233Pa, a strong neutron poison. Unlike the thorium breeding molten salt reactor, these designs don’t have on-board fuel reprocessing, and that’s a very heavy, complex system that is going to kill your engine’s dry mass, so just adding one isn’t a good option from a systems engineering point of view. So, initially, the reactor loses a neutron to the 232Th, which then changes to 233Th before quickly decaying into 233Pa, a strong neutron poison which will stay in the reactor until long after the reactor is shut down (and so waste energy will need to be dealt with, but radiation may/probably is enough to deal with that), and then it’s likely that the next time the engine is started up, that neutron poison has transmuted into an even more fissile material unless you load the fuel with 233U first (233U has a stronger fission capture cross-section than 235U, which in practical effect reduces the fissile requirements by ~33%)!

This means that the reactor has to go through startup, have a reasonably large amount of control authority to continue to add reactivity to the reactor to counterbalance the fission poison buildup of not only 233Pa, but other fission product neutron poisons and fissile fuel worth degradation (if the fuel element has been used before), and then be able to deal with a potentially more reactive reactor (if the breeding ratio has more of a fudge factor due to the fast ramp-up/ramp-down behavior of this reactor, varying power levels, etc, making it higher in effect than ~1.01/4).

The other potential issue is that if you need less fissile material in the core, every atom of fissile is more valuable in the core than a less fissile fuel. If the vapor entrainment ends up being higher than the effective breeding ratio (i.e. the effect of breeding when the reactor’s operating), then the reactor’s going to lose reactivity too fast to maintain. Along these lines, the 233Pa behavior is also going to need to be studied, because that’s not only your future fuel, but also a strong neutron poison, in a not-great neutronic configuration for your fuel element, so there’s a few complications on that intermediate step.

This is an addressable option, potentially, but it’s also a lot of work on a reactor that already has a lot of work needed to make feasible.

Conclusions

Liquid fueled NTRs (LNTRs) show great promise as a stepping stone to advanced NTR development in both their variations, the bubbler and radiator variants. The high specific impulse, as well as potentially high thrust-to-weight ratio, offer benefits for many interplanetary missions, both crewed and uncrewed.

However, there are numerous challenges in the way of developing these systems. Of all the NTR types, they are some of the least researched, with only a handful of studies conducted in the 1960s, and a single project in the 1990s. These projects have focused on a single family of fuels, and those have not been able to be tested under fission power for various neutronic and reactor physics behaviors necessary for the proper modeling of these systems.

Additionally, the interactions between the fuel and propellant in these systems is far more complex than it is in most other fuel types. Only two other types of NTR (the droplet/colloid core and open cycle gas core NTRs) face the same level of challenge in fissile fuel retention and fuel element mass entrainment that the LNTR faces, especially in the bubbler variation.

Finally, they are some of the least well-known variations of NTR in both popular and technical literature, with only a few papers ever being published and only short blurbs on popular websites due to the difficulty in finding the technical source material.

We will continue to look at these systems in the next two blog posts, covering the bubbler-type LNTR in the next one, and the radiator type in the one following that. These blog posts are already in progress, and should be ready for publication in the near term.

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References

General

Specific Impulse of a Liquid Core Nuclear Rocket, Barrett Jr 1963 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/3.2141?journalCode=aiaaj

ANALYSES OF VAPORIZATION IN LIQUID URANIUM BEARING SYSTEMS AT VERY HIGH TEMPERATURES Kaufman and Peters 1965 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19660002967.pdf

VAPOR-PRESSURE DATA EXTRAPOLATED TO 1000 ATMOSPHERES (1.01~108 N/m2) FOR 13 REFRACTORY MATERIALS WITH LOW THERMAL ABSORPTION CROSS SECTIONS Masser 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670030361.pdf

VAPOR-PRESSURE DATA EXTRAPOLATED TO 1000 ATMOSPHERES FOR 10 REFRACTORY ELEMENTS WITH THERMAL ABSORPTION CROSS SECTIONS LESS THAN 5 BARNS Masser 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19680016226.pdf

Bubbler

A Technical Report on the CONCEPTUAL DESIGN – STUDY OF A LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET, Nelson et al 1963 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19650026954.pdf

Radiator

“PERFORMANCE POTENTIAL OF A RADIANT-HEAT-TRANSFER LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET ENGINE,” Ragsdale 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670030774.pdf

HEAT- AND MASS-TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF AN AXIAL-FLOW LIQUID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET EMPLOYING RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER, Ragsdale et al 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670024548.pdf

“FEASIBILITY OF SUPPORTING LIQUID FUEL ON A SOLID WALL NUCLEAR ROCKET CONCEPT,” Putre and Kasack 1968 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19680007624.pdf

The Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS) Propulsion, Powell et al 1992 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19910012832.pdf

Categories
Nuclear Thermal Systems Test Stands

Fluid Fueled NTRs: A Brief Introduction

 Hello, and welcome back to Beyond NERVA! This is actually about the 6th blog post I’ve started, and then split up when they ran more than 20 pages long, in the last month, and more explanatory material was needed before I discussed the concepts I was trying to discuss (this blog post has also been split up multiple times).

I apologize about the long hiatus. A combination of personal, IRL complications (I’ve updated the “About Me” section to reflect this, but those will not affect the type of content I share on here), and the professional (and still under wraps) opportunity of a lifetime have kept me away from the blog for a while. I want to return to Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTRs) for a while, rather than continuing Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) power plants, as a fun, still-not-covered area for me to work my way back into writing regularly for y’all again.

This is the first in an extensive blog series on fluid fueled NTRs, of three main types: liquid, vapor, and gas core NTRs. These reactors avoid the thermal limitations of the fuel elements themselves, increasing the potential core temperature to above 2550 K (the generally accepted maximum thermal limit on workable carbide fuel elements), increasing the specific impulse of these rockets. At the same time, structural material thermal limits, challenges in adequately heating the propellant to gain these advantages in a practical way, fissile fuel containment, and power density issues are major concerns in these types of reactors, so we’re going to dig into the weeds of the general challenges of fluid fueled reactors in general in this blog post (with some details on each reactor type’s design envelope).

Let’s start by looking at the basics behind how a nuclear reactor can operate without any solid fuel elements, and what the advantages and disadvantages of going this route are.

Non-Solid Fuels

A nuclear reactor is, at its basic level, a method of maintaining a fission reaction in a particular region for a given time. This depends on maintaining a combination of two characteristics: the number of fissile atoms in a given volume, and the number and energy of neutrons in that same volume (the neutron flux). As long as the number of neutrons and the number of fissile atoms in the area are held in balance, a controlled fission reaction will occur in that area.

Solid Core Fuel Element, image DOE

The easiest way to maintain that reaction is to hold the fissile atoms in a given place using a solid matrix of material – a fuel element. However, a number of things have to be balanced for a fuel element to be a useful and functional piece of reactor equipment. For an astronuclear reactor, there are two main concerns: the amount of power produced by the fission reaction has to be balanced by how much thermal energy the fuel element is able to contain, and the fuel element needs to survive the chemical and thermal environment that it is exposed to in the reactor. (Another for terrestrial reactors is that the fuel element has to contain the resulting fission products from the reaction itself, as well as any secondary chemical pollutants, but this isn’t necessarily a problem for astronuclear reactors, where the only environment that’s of concern is the more heavily shielded payload of the rocket.) 

This doesn’t mean that a reactor has to use a solid fuel element. As the increasingly well known molten salt reactor, as well as various other fluid fueled reactor concepts, demonstrate, the only requirement is the combination of the number of fissile atoms and the required energy level and density of neutrons to exist in the same region of the reactor. This, especially in Russian literature, is called the “active zone” of the reactor core. This can be an especially useful as a term, since the reactor core can contain areas that aren’t as active in terms of fission activity. (A great example of this is the travelling wave reactor, most recently investigated – and then abandoned – by Terrestrial Energy.) But more generally it’s useful to differentiate the fueled areas undergoing fission from other structures in the reactor, such as neutron moderation and control regions in the reactor. The key takeaway is that, as long as there is enough fuel, and the right density of neutrons at the right energy, then a sustained – and controlled – fission reactor has been achieved.

The obvious consequence is that the solid fuel element isn’t required – and in the case of a nuclear thermal rocket, where the efficiency of the rocket is directly tied to the temperature it can achieve, the solid fuel is in fact a major limitation to a designer. The downside to this is that, unlike solids, fluids tend to move, especially under thrust. Because the materials used in a solid fueled rocket are already at the extremes of what molecular bonds can handle, this means that either very clever cooling or very robust containment methods need to be used to keep the rest of the reactor from destroying itself.

Finally, one of the interesting consequences of not having a solid fuel element is that the reactor’s power density (W/m^2) and specific power (W/kg) can be increased in proportion to how much coolant can be used in theory, but in practice it can be challenging to maintain a high power density in certain types of fluid fueled reactors due to the high rate of thermal expansion that these reactors can undergo. There are ways around this, and fluid fueled reactors can have higher power densities than even closely related solid fueled variants, but the fact that fluids are able to expand much more than solids under high temperatures is an effect that should be taken into account. On the other hand, if the fluid expands too much, it can drop the power density, but not necessarily the specific mass of the system.

Types of and Reasons for Fluid Fuels

Fluid fuels fall into three broad categories: liquids, vapors, and gasses. There are intermediate steps, and hybrids between various phase states of fuel, but these three broad categories are useful. While liquid fuels are fairly self-explanatory (a liquid state fissile material is used to fuel the core, often uranium carbide mixed with other carbides, or U-Mo, but other options exist), the vapor and gas concepts are far less straightforward overall. The vapor core has two major variants: discrete liquid droplets, or a low pressure, relatively low temperature gaseous suspension similar to a cloud. The gas core could be more appropriately called a “plasma core,” since these are very high temperature reactors, which either mechanically hold the plasma in place, or use hydrodynamic or electrodynamic forces to hold the plasma in place.

However, they all have some common advantages, so we’ll look at them as a group first. The obvious reason for using non-solid fuel, in most cases, is that they are generally less thermally limited than solid fuels are (with some exceptions). This means that higher core temperatures, and therefore higher exhaust velocity (and specific impulse) can be achieved.

Convection pattern in radiator-type
liquid fuel element, image DOE

An additional benefit to most fluid fueled designs is that the fluid nature of the fuel helps mitigate or eliminate hot spots in the fuel. With solid fuels, one of the major challenges is to distribute the fissile material throughout the fuel as evenly as possible (or along a specifically desired gradient of fissile content depending on the position of the fuel element within the reactor). If this isn’t done properly, either through a manufacturing flaw or migration of the fissile component as a fuel element becomes weakened or damaged during use, then a hot spot can develop and damage the fuel element in both its nuclear and mechanical properties, leaning to a potentially failed fuel element. If the process is widespread enough, this can damage or destroy the entire reactor.

Fluid fuels, on the other hand, have the advantage that the fuel isn’t statically held in a solid structure. Let’s look at what happens when the fuel isn’t fully homogeneous (completely mixed) to understand this:

  1. A higher density of fissile atoms in the fuel results in more fission occurring in a particular volume.
  2. The fuel heats up through both radiation absorption and fission fragment heating.
  3. The fuel in this volume becomes less dense as the temperature increases.
  4. The increased volume, combined with convective mixing of cooler fuel fluids and radiation/conduction from the surface of the hotter region cools the region further.
  5. At the same time, the lower density decreases the fission occurring in that volume, while it remains at previous levels in the “normally heated” regions.
  6. The hot spot dissipates, and the fuel returns to a (mostly) homogeneous thermal and fissile profile.

In practice, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the fuel is the same temperature throughout the element – this very rarely occurs, in fact. Power levels and temperatures will vary throughout the fuel, causing natural vortices and other structures to appear. Depending on the fuel element configuration, this can be either minimized or enhanced depending on the need of the reactor. However, the mixing of the fuel is considered a major advantage in this sort of fuel.

Another advantage to using fluid fuels (although one that isn’t necessarily high on the priority list of most designs) is that the reactor can be refueled more easily. In most solid fueled reactors, the fissile content, fission poison content, and other key characteristics are carefully distributed through the reactor before startup, to ensure that the reactor will behave as predictably as possible for as long as possible at the desired operating conditions. In terrestrial solid reactors, refueling is a complex, difficult process, which involves moving specific fuel bundles in a complex pattern to ensure the reactor will continue to operate properly, with only a little bit of new fuel added with each refueling cycle.

PEWEE Test stand, image courtesy DOE

There were only two refuelable NTR testbeds in the US Rover program: Pewee and the Nuclear Furnace. Both of these were designed to be fuel element development apparatus, rather than functional NTRs (although Pewee managed to hit the highest Isp of any NTR tested in Rover without even trying!), so this is a significant difference. While it’s possible to refuel a solid core NTR, especially one such as the RD-0410 with its discrete fuel bundles, the likely method would be to just replace the entire fueled portion of the reactor – not the best option for ease of refueling, and one that would likely require a drydock of sorts to complete the work. To give an example, even the US Navy doesn’t always refuel their reactors, opting for long-lived highly enriched uranium fuel which will last for the life of the reactor. If the ship needs refueled, the reactor is removed and replaced whole in most cases. This reticence to refuel solid core reactors is likely to still be a thing in astronuclear reactors for the indefinite future, since placing the fuel elements is a complex process that requires a lot of real-time analysis of the particulars of the individual fuel elements and reactors (in Rover this was done at the Pajarito Site in Los Alamos).

Fluid fuels, though, can be added or removed from the reactor using pumps, compressed gasses, centrifugal force, or other methods. While not all designs have the capability to be refueled, many do, and some even require online fuel removal, processing and reinsertion into the active region of the core to maintain proper operation. If this is being done in a microgravity environment, there will be other challenges to address as well, but these have already been at least partially addressed by on-orbit experiments over the decades in the various space programs. (Specific behaviors of certain fluids will likely need to be experimentally tested for this particular application, but the basic physics and engineering solutions have been researched before).

Finally, fluid fuels also allow for easier transport of the fuel from one location to another, including into orbit or another planet. Rather than having a potentially damageable solid pellet, rod, prism, or ribbon, which must be carefully packaged to not only prevent damage but accidental criticality, fluids can be transported with far less risk of damage: just ensure that accidental criticality can’t occur, chemical compatibility between the fluid and the vessel it’s carrying, and package it strongly enough to survive an accident, and the problem is solved. If chemical processing and synthesis is available wherever the fuel is being sent (likely, if extensive and complex ISRU is being conducted), then the fuel doesn’t even need to be in its final form: more chemically inert options (UF4 and UF6 can be quite corrosive, but are easily managed with current materials and techniques), or less fissile-dense options (to reduce the chance of accidental criticality further) can be used as fuel precursors, and the final fuel form can be synthesized at the fueling depot. This may not be necessary, or even desirable, in most cases, but the option is available.

So, while solid fuels offer certain advantages over fluid fuels, the combination of being more delicate (thermally, chemically, and mechanically) combine to make fluid fuels a very attractive option. Once NTRs are in use, it is likely that research into fluid fueled NTRs will accelerate, making these “advanced” systems a reality.

Fuel Elements: An Overview

Now that we’ve looked at the advantages of fluid fuels in general, let’s look at the different types of fluid fuels and the proposals for the form the fuel elements in these reactors would take. This will be a brief overview of the various types of fuels, with more in-depth examinations coming up in future blog posts.

Liquid Fuel

A liquid fueled reactor is the best known popularly, although the most common type (the molten salt reactor) uses either fluoride or chloride salts, both of which are very corrosive at the temperatures an NTR operates at. While I’ve heard arguments that the extensive use of regenerative cooling can address this thermal limitation, this would still remain a major problem for an NTR. Another liquid fuel type, the molten metal reactor, has also been tested, using highly corrosive plutonium fuel in the best known case (the Liquid Annular Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiment, or LAMPRE, run by Los Alamos Scientific Lab from 1957 to 1963, covered very well here).

Early bubbler-type liquid NTR, Barrett 1963

The first proposal for a liquid fueled NTR was in 1954, by J McCarthy in “Nuclear Reactors for Rockets.” This design spun molten uranium carbide to produce centrifugal force (a common characteristic in liquid NTRs of all designs), and passed the propellant through a porous outer wall, through the fuel mass, and into the central void in the reactor before it was ejected out of the nozzle.The main problem with this reactor was that the tube was simply too large to allow for as much heat transfer as was ideal to take place, so the next evolution of the design broke up the single large spinning fuel element up into several thinner ones of the same length, increasing the total surface area available for heating the propellant. This work was conducted at Princeton, and would continue on and off until 1973. These designs I generally call “bubblers,” due to the propellant flow path.

Princeton multi-fuel-element bubbler, Nelson et al 1963

One problem with these designs is that the fuel would vaporize in the low pressure hydrogen environment of the bubbles, and significant amounts of uranium would be lost as the propellant went through the fuel. Not only is uranium valuable, but it’s heavy, reducing the exhaust velocity and therefore the specific impulse. Another issue is that there are hard limits to how much propellant can be passed through the fuel at any given time before it starts to splatter, directly tying thrust to fuel volume. 

In order to combat this, a team at NASA’s Lewis Research Center decided to study the idea of passing the propellant only through the central void in the fuel, allowing radiation to be the sole means of heating the propellant. Additional regenerative cooling structures were needed for this design, and ensuring the propellant got heated sufficiently was a challenge, but this sort of LNTR, the radiator type, became the predominant design. Vapor losses of the uranium were still a problem, but were minimized in this configuration.

It too would be cancelled in the late 1960s, but briefly revived by a team at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1990s for possible use in the Space Exploration Initiative, however this program was not selected for further development.

Despite these challenges, liquid core NTRs have the potential to reach above 1300 s isp, and a T/W ratio of up to 0.5, so there is definite promise in the concept.

Droplet/Vapor Fuel

Picture a spray bottle, the sort used for household plants, ironing, or cleaning products like window cleaner. When the trigger is pulled, there’s a fine spray of liquid exiting the nozzle, which contains a mix of liquid and gas. Using a similar system to mix liquids and gasses is possible in a nuclear reactor, and is called a droplet core NTR. This reactor type is useful in that there’s incredible surface area available for radiation to occur into the propellant, but unfortunately it also means that separating the fuel droplets from the propellant upon leaving the nozzle (as well as preventing the fuel from coating the reactor core walls) is a major hydrodynamics challenge in this type of reactor.

Vapor core NTR, Diaz et al 1992

The other option is to use a vapor as fuel. A vapor is a substance that is in a gaseous state, but not at the critical point of the material – i.e. at standard temperature and pressure it would still be a liquid. One interesting property of a vapor is that a vapor is able to be condensed or evaporated in order to change the phase state of the substance without changing its temperature, which could be a useful tool to use for reactor startup. The downside of this type of fuel is that it has to be in an enclosed vessel in order to maintain the vapor state.

So why is this useful in an NTR? Despite the headaches we’ve just (briefly, believe it or not) discussed in the liquid fuels section, liquid fuel has a major advantage over gaseous fuel (our next section): the liquid phase is far better at containing its constituent parts than the gas phase is, due to the higher interatomic bond strength. At the same time, maintaining a large, liquid body can be a challenge, especially in the context of complex molecular structures in some of the most chemically difficult elements known to humanity (the actinides and transuranics). If the liquid component is small, though, it’s far easier to manage the thermal distribution, as well as offering greater thermal diffusion options (remember, the heat IN the fissile fuel needs to be moved OUT of it, and into the propellant, which is a direct function of available surface area).

The droplet core NTR offers many advantages over a liquid fuel in that the large-scale behavior of the liquid fuel isn’t a concern for reactor dynamics, and the aforementioned high surface area offers awesome thermal transfer properties throughout the propellant feed, rather than being focused on one volume of the propellant.

Vapors offer a middle ground between liquids and gasses: the fissile fuel itself is in suspension, meaning that the individual molecules of fissile fuel are able to circulate and maintain a more or less homogeneous temperature. 

This is another design concept that has seen very little development as an NTR (although NEP applications have been investigated more thoroughly, something that we’ll discuss the application and complications of, for an NTR in the future). In fact, I’ve only ever been able to find one design of each type designed for NTR use (and a series of evolving designs for NEP), the appropriately named Droplet Core Nuclear Rocket (DCNR) and the Nuclear Vapor Thermal Reactor (NTVR).

Droplet Core NTR, Anghaie et al 1992

The DCNR was developed in the late 1980s based on an earlier design from the 1970s, the colloid core reactor. The original design used ultrafine microparticles of U-C-ZR carbide fuel, which would be suspended in the propellant flow. This sort of fuel is something that we’ll look at more when covering gas core NTRs (metal microparticles are one of the fuel types available for a GCNTR), but the use of carbides increases the fuel failure temperature to the point that structural components would fail before the fuel itself would, leading to what could be called an early pseudo-dusty plasma NTR. The droplet core NTR took this concept, and applied it to a liquid rather than solid fuel form. We’ll look at how the fuel was meant to be contained before exiting the nozzle in the next section, but this was the main challenge of the DCNR from an engineering point of view.

The NVTR was a compromise design based on NERVA fuel element development with a different fissile fuel carrier. Here, the fuel (in the form of UF4) is contained within a carbon-carbon composite fuel element in sealed channels, with interspersed coolant channels to manage the thermal load on the fuel element. While significant thrust-to-weight ratio improvements were possible, and (in advanced NTR terms) modest specific impulse gains were possible, the design didn’t undergo any significant development. We’ll cover containment in the next section, and other options for architectures as well.

Gas Fuel

Finally, there are gas core NTRs. In these, the fuel is in gaseous form, allowing for the highest core temperatures of any core configuration. Due to the very high temperatures of these reactors, the uranium (and in general the rest of the components in the fuel) become ionized, meaning that a “plasma core” is as accurate a description as a “gas core” is, but gas remains the convention. The fuel form for a gas core NTR has a few variants, with the most common being UF6, or metal fuel which vaporizes as it is injected into the core. Due to the high temperatures of these reactors, the UF6 will often break down as all of the constituent molecules become ionized, meaning that whatever structures will come in contact with the fuel itself (either containment structures or nozzle components) must be designed in such a way to prevent being attacked by high temperature fluorine ions and hydrofluoric acid vapors formed when the fluorine ions come in contact with the propellant.

Containing the gas is generally done in one of three ways: either by compressing the gas mechanically in a container, by holding the gas in the middle of the reactor using the gas pressure from the propellant being injected into the core, or by using electromagnets to contain the plasma similarly to how a spherical tokamak operates. The first concept is a closed cycle   gas core (CCGCNTR, or GC-C), while the second two are called open cycle gas core NTRs (OCGCNTR or GC-O), because while the first one physically contains the fuel and prevents fission products, unburned fuel, and the previously mentioned free fluorine from exiting in the exhaust plume of the reactor, the open cycle’s largest problem in designing a workable NTR is that the vast majority (often upwards of 90%) if the uranium ends up being stripped away from the plasma body before it undergoes fission – a truly hot radioactive mess which you don’t want to use anywhere near anything sensitive to radiation and an insanely inefficient use of fissile material. There are many other designs and hybrids of these concepts, which we’ll cover in the gas core NTR series, and will look briefly at the containment challenges below.

Fluid Fuel Elements: Containment Strategies

Fluid fuels are, well, fluid. Unlike with a solid fuel element, as we’ve looked at in the past, a fluid has to be contained somehow. This can be in a sealed container or by using some outside force to keep it in place.

Another issue with fluid fuels can be (but isn’t always) maintaining the necessary density to achieve the power requirements for an NTR (or any astronuclear system, for that matter). All materials expand when heated, but with fluids this change can be quite dramatic, especially in the case of gas core NTRs. Because of this, careful design is required in order to maintain the high density of fissile fuel necessary to make a mass-efficient rocket engine possible.

This leads to a rather obvious conclusion: rather than the fuel element being a physical object, in a fluid fueled NTR the fuel element is a containment structure. Depending on the fuel type and the reactor architecture, this can take many forms, even in the same type of fuel. This will be a long-ish review of the proposed fuel containment strategies, and how they impact the performance of the reactors themselves.

One thing to note about all of these reactor types is that 235U is not required to be the fissile component in the fuel, in fact many gas core designs use 233U instead, due to the lower requirements for critical mass. (According to most Russian literature on gas core NTRs, this  reduces the critical mass requirements by 1/3). Other options include using 242mAm, a stable isomer of 242Am, which has the lowest critical mass of any fissile fuel. By using these types of fuels rather than the typical 235U, either less of the fuel mass needs to be fissile (in the case of a liquid fueled NTR), or less fuel in general is needed (in the case of vapor/gas core NTRs). This can be a double-edged sword in some systems with high fuel loss rates (like an open cycle gas core), which would require more robust and careful fuel management strategies to prevent power transients due to fuel level variations in the active zone of the reactor, but the overall reduction in fuel requirements means that there’s less fuel that can be lost. Many other fissile fuel types also exist, but generally speaking either short half-lives, high spontaneous fission rates, or expense in manufacture have prevented them from being extensively researched.

Let’s look at each of the design types in general, with a particular focus on gas core NTRs at the end.

Liquid FE

For liquid fuels, there’s one universal option for containing the fuel: by spinning the fuel element. However, after this, there’s two main camps on how a liquid fueled NTR interacts with the propellant. The original design, first proposed in the 1950s and researched at least through the 1960s, proposed the use of either one or several spinning cylinders with porous outer walls (frits), which would be used to inject the propellant into the reactor’s active region. For those that remember the Dumbo reactor, this may be familiar as a folded flow NTR, and does two things: first, it allowed the area surrounding the fuel elements to be kept at very low temperatures, allowing the use of ZrH and other thermally sensitive materials throughout the reactor, and second it increases the heat transfer area available from the fuel to the propellant. Experiments (using water as a uranium analog) were conducted to study the basics of bubble behavior in a spinning fluid to estimate fuel mass loss rates, and the impact of evaporation or vaporization of various forms of uranium (including U metal, UC2, and others) were conducted. 

This concept is the radiator type LNTR. Here, rather than the folded flow used previously, axial flow is used: the H2 is used as a coolant for reactor structures (including the nozzle) passing from the nozzle end to the ship end, and then injected through the central void of each of the fuel elements before exiting the nozzle. This design reduces the loss of fuel mass due to bubbling in the fuel, but adds an additional challenge of severely reducing the amount of surface area available for heat transfer from the fuel to the propellant. In order to mitigate this, some designs propose to seed the propellant with microparticles of tungsten, which would absorb the significant about of UV and X rays coming off the fuel, and turn it into IR radiation which is more easily absorbed by the H. At the designed operating temperatures, this reactor would dissociate the majority of the H2 into monatomic hydrogen, increasing the specific impulse significantly.

In all these designs, there is no solid clad between the fuel itself and the propellant, because this means that the hottest portion of the fuel element would be limited by how high the temperature can reach before melting the clad. Some early LNTR designs used a mix of molten UC2 and ZrC/NbC as a fuel element, with the ZrC meant to migrate to the upper areas of the fuel element and not only provide neutron moderation but reduce the amount of erosion from the propellant. It may be possible to use a liquid metal clad as a barrier to prevent mass erosion of the fissile fuel in a metal fueled reactor as well, and possibly even add some neutron moderation for the fuel element itself. However, the material would need to have not only a very high boiling point, high thermal conductivity, low reactivity to both hydrogen and the fuel, and low neutron capture cross section, it would also need to have a high vapor pressure in order to prevent erosion from the propellant flow (although I suppose adding additional clad during the course of operation would also be an option, at the cost of higher propellant mass and therefore lost specific impulse).

Droplet/Vapor FE

Now let’s look at the vapor core NTR.

NVTR fuel element, Diaz et al 1992

Containing the UF4 vapor in the NVTR vapor core NTR is done by using a sealed tube embedded in a fuel element, which is then surrounded by propellant channels to carry away the heat. Two configurations were proposed in the NTVR concept: the first used a large central cavity, sealed at both ends, to contain the vapor, and the second design dispersed the fuel cylinders in an alternating hexagonal pattern throughout the fuel element. The second option provides a more even thermal distribution not only within the fuel element itself, but across the entire active zone of the reactor core.

Droplet core NTRs are very different in their core structure. Rather than having multiple areas that the fissile fuel is isolated in, the droplet core sprays droplets of fissile fuel into a large cylinder, which is spun to induce centrifugal force. The fuel is kept away from the walls of the reactor core using a collection of high-pressure H2 jets, injecting the propellant into the fuel suspension and maintaining hydrostatic containment on the fuel. The last section of the reactor core, instead of using hydrogen, injects a liquid lithium spray to bind with the uranium, which is then carried to the walls of the reactor due to the lack of tangential force. The fuel is then recirculated to the top of the reactor vessel, where it is once again injected into the core.

This hydrostatic equilibrium concept is very similar to how many gas core NTRs operate (which we’ll look at below), and has proven to be the biggest Achilles’ Heel of these sorts of designs. While it may be theoretically possible to do this (the lower temperatures of the droplet core allow for collection and recirculation, which may provide a means of fissile fuel loss reduction), many of the challenges of the droplet core are very similar to that of the open cycle gas core, a far more capable engine type.

Gas Core

Gas core containment is possibly the most complex topic in this post, due to the sheer variety of possible designs and extreme engineering requirements. We’ll be discussing the different designs in depth in upcoming blog posts, but it’s worth doing an overview of the different designs, their strengths and weaknesses, here.

Closed Cycle

One half of the lightbulb configuration, McLafferty et al 1968

The simplest design to describe is the closed cycle gas core, which in many ways resembles a vapor core NTR. In most iterations, a sealed cylinder with a piston at one end (similar in many ways to the piston in an automobile engine), is filled with UF6 gas. This is compressed in order to reach critical geometry, and fission occurs in the cylinder. The walls of the cylinder are generally made out of quartz, which is transparent to the majority of the radiation coming off the fissioning uranium, and is able to resist the fluorination from the gas (other options include silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide, and aluminum oxide). Additionally, while the quartz will darken under the heat, the radiation actually “anneals” the quartz to keep it transparent, and coolant is run through the cylinder to maintain the material within thermal limits; a vortex is induced during fission which, when properly managed, also keeps the majority of the uranium (now in a charged state) from coming in contact with the walls of the chamber as well, reducing thermal load on the material. Some designs have used pressure waves in place of the piston to induce fission, but the fluid-mechanical result is very similar. This results in a lightbulb-like structure, hence the common nickname “nuclear lightbulb.” One variation mentioned in Russian literature also uses a closed uranium loop, circulating the fissile fuel to minimize the fission product buildup and maintain the fissile density of the reactor.

The main advantage to these types of designs is that all fission products and particle radiation are contained within the bulb structure, meaning that fission product and radiation release into the environment is eliminated, with only gamma and x-ray radiation during operation being a concern. However, due to the fact that there’s a solid structure between the fuel element and the propellant, this engine is thermally limited more than any other gas core design, and its performance in both thrust and specific impulse suffers as a result.

Open Cycle

The next very broad category is an open cycle gas core. Here, there is usually no solid structure between the fissioning uranium and the propellant, meaning that core temperatures can reach astoundingly high temperatures (sometimes limited only by the melting temperature of the materials surrounding the active reactor zone, such as reflectors and pressure vessel). Sadly, this also means that actually containing the fuel is the single largest challenge in this type of reactor, and the exhaust tends to be incredibly radioactive as a result, On the plus side, this sort of rocket can achieve isp in the tens of thousands of seconds (similar to or better than electric propulsion), and also achieve high thrust.

Perhaps the easiest way to make a pure open cycle gas core NTR is to allow the fuel and the propellant to fully mix, similarly to how the droplet core NTR was done, and either ensure all (or most) of the fissile fuel is burned before leaving the rocket nozzle. Insanely radioactive, sure, but with a complete mixing of the fissioning atoms and the propellant the theoretically most efficient transfer of energy is possible. However, the challenge of fully fissioning the fuel in such a short period of time is significant, and I can’t find any evidence of significant research into this type of gas core reactor.

Due to the challenges of burning the fissile fuel completely enough during a single pass through the reactor, though, it is generally considered required to maintain a more stable fissile structure within the reactor’s active region. Maintaining this sort of structure is a challenge, but is generally done through gasdynamic effects: the propellant injected into the reactor is used to push the fuel back into the center of the reactor. This involves the use of a porous outer wall of the reactor, where the hydrogen propellant is inserted at a high enough pressure and evenly enough spaced intervals to counterbalance both the tendency of the plasma to expand until it’s not able to undergo fission and the tendency of the fuel to leave the nozzle before being burned.

Soviet-type Vortex Stabilized open cycle, image Koroteev et al 2007

The next way is to create a low pressure stagnant area in the center of the core, which will contain the fissile fuel. In order to maintain this type of pressure differential, a solid structure is usually needed, generally made out of a high temperature refractory metal. In a way this is a hybrid closed/open cycle gas core (even though the plasma isn’t in direct contact with the structure of the reactor itself), because the structure itself is key to generating this low pressure zone necessary for maintaining this plasma body fuel element. This type of NTR has been the focus of Russian gas core research since the 1970s, and will be covered more in the future.

Spherical gas core diagram, image NASA

As I’m sure most of you have guessed, fuel containment is a very complex and difficult problem, and one that’s had many solutions over the years (which we’ll cover in a future post). Most recent gas core NTR designs in the US are based on the spherical gas core. Here, the plasma is held in the center of the active zone using jets of propellant from all sides. This is generally called a porous wall gas core NTR, and while it takes advantage of any vortex stabilization that may occur in the fuel, it does not rely on it; in many ways, it’s a lot like an indoor skydiving arena with air jets blowing from all sides. This design, first proposed in the 1970s, uses high pressure propellant to contain the fuel in the reactor, and in many designs the flow can be adjusted to deal with the engine being under thrust, pushing the fuel toward the nozzle in traditional design configurations. Most designs suffer from massive erosion of the fuel by shear forces from the propellant eroding the fuel from the outside edge, but in some conceptual sketches this can be gotten around using non-traditional nozzle configurations which have a solid structure along the main thrust axis of the rocket. (More on that in a future post. I’m still trying to track down the sources to fully explain that pseudo-aerospike concept).

Hybrid gas core diagram, Beveridge 2017

The most promising designs as far as fuel loss rates minimize the amount of plasma required to maintain the reaction. This is what’s known as a hybrid solid-gas NTR, first proposed by Hyland in the 1970s, and also one of the designs which has been most recently investigated by Lucas Beveridge. Here, the fissile fuel is split between two components: the high-temperature plasma fuel is used for final heating of the propellant, but isn’t able to sustain fission independently. Instead, a sphere of solid fuel encases the outside of the active zone of the reactor. This minimizes the amount of fuel that can be easily eroded while ensuring that a critical mass of fissile material is contained in the active region of the reactor. This really is less complicated than it sounds, but is difficult to summarize briefly without delving into the details of critical geometry, so I’ll try to explain it this way: the interior of the reactor is viewed by the neutrons in the reactor as a high-density low temperature fuel area, surrounding a low density high temperature fuel area, with the coolant/moderator passing through the high density area and flowing around the low density area, making a complete reactor between these parts while minimizing how much of the low density fuel is needed and therefore minimizing the fuel loss. I wish I was able to make this more clear in less than a couple pages, but sadly I’m not that good at summarizing in non-technical terms. I’ll try and do better on the hybrid core post coming in the future.

All of these designs suffer from massive fuel loss, leading to highly radioactive exhaust and incredibly inefficient engines which are absurdly expensive to operate due to the amount of highly enriched fissile fuel needed. (Because everything going into the reactor needs to fission as quickly as possible, every component of the fuel itself needs to undergo fission as easily as possible.) This is the major Achilles heel of this NTR type: despite the massive potential promise, the fuel loss, and radioactive plume coming off these reactors, make them unusable with current engineering.

There’s going to be a lot more that I’m going to write about this type of NTR, and I skipped a lot of ideas, and variations on these ideas, so expect a lot more in the coming year on this subject.

Cooling the Reactor/Heating the Propellant

Finally there’s cooling, which usually comes in one of two varieties:

  1. cooling using the propellant, as in most NTR designs that we’ve seen, to reject all the heat from the reactor
  2. cooling in a closed loop, as is done in an NEP system
Hybrid gas core with secondary cooling diagram, Beveridge 2017

While the ideal situation is to reject all the heat into the propellant, which maximizes the thrust and minimizes the dry mass of the system, this is the exception in many of these systems, rather than the norm. There’s a couple reasons for this: containing a fluid with fast-moving (or high pressure) hydrogen is challenging because the gas wants to strip away the mass that it comes in contact with (far easier in a fluid than a solid), H2 is insanely difficult to contain at almost any temperature, and these reactors are designed to achieve incredibly high temperatures which can outstrip the available heat rejection area that the reactor designs allow.

Complicating the issue further, hydrogen is mostly transparent to the radiation that a nuclear reactor puts off (mostly in the hard UV/X/gamma spectrum), meaning that it takes a lot of hydrogen to reject the heat produced in the reactor (a common complaint in any gas-cooled reactor, to be fair), and that hydrogen doesn’t get heated that much on an atom-by-atom basis, all things considered.

There’s a way around this, though, which many designs, from LARS on the liquid side to basically every gas core design I’ve ever seen use: microparticle or vapor seeding. This is a form of hybrid propellant, which I mention in my NTR propellants page. Basically, a metal is ground incredibly fine (or is vaporized), and then included in the propellant feed. This captures the high-wavelength photons (due to its higher atomic mass, and greater opacity to those wavelengths as a result), which are re-emitted at a lower frequency which is more easily absorbed by the propellant. While the US prefers to use tungsten microparticles in their designs, the USSR and Russia have also examined two other types of metals: lithium and NaK vapor. These have the advantage of being lower mass, impacting the overall propellant mass less, and also far easier to control fluid insertion rates (although microparticles can act as fluidized materials due to their small size, and maintain suspension in the H2 propellant well). This is a subject that I’ll cover in more depth in the future in the gas core NTR post.

(Side note: I’ve NEVER seen data on non-hydrogen propellant in a liquid-fueled NTR, but this problem would be somewhat ameliorated by using a higher atomic mass fuel, but which one is used will determine both how much more radiation would be directly absorbed, and what kind of loss in specific impulse would accompany this substitution. Also, using other elements/molecules would significantly change the neutronic structure and hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor, a subject I’ve never seen covered in any paper.)

Sadly, in many designs there simply isn’t the heat capacity to remove all of the reactor’s thermal energy through the propellant stream. Early gas core NTRs were especially notorious for this, with some only able to reject about 3% of the reactor’s thermal energy into the propellant. In order to prevent the reactor and pressure vessel from melting, external radiators were used – hence the large, arrowhead-shaped radiators on many gas core NTR designs.

This is unfortunate, since it directly affects the dry mass of the system, making it not only heavier but less power efficient overall. Fortunately, due to the high temperatures which need to be rejected, advanced high temperature radiators can be used (such as liquid droplet radiators, membrane radiators, or high temperature liquid metal radiators) which can reject more energy in less mass and surface area.

Another example, one which I’ve never seen discussed before (with one exception) is the use of a bimodal system. If significant amounts of heat are coming off the reactor, then it may be worth it to use a power conversion system to convert some of the heat into electricity for an electric propulsion system to back up the pure thermal system. This is something that would have to be carefully considered, for a number of reasons:

  1. It increases the complexity of the system: power conversion system, power conditioning system, thrusters, and support subsystems for each must be added, and each needs extensive reliability testing.
  2. It will significantly increase the mass of the system, so either the thrust needs to be significantly increased or the overall thrust efficiency needs to offset the additional dry mass (depending on the desire for thrust or efficiency in the system).
    1. Knock on mass increases will be extensive, with likely additions being: an additional primary heat loop, larger radiators for heat rejection, main truss restructuring and brackets, additional radiation shielding for certain radiation sensitive components, possible backup power conditioning and storage systems, and many other subsystem support structures.
  3. This concept has not been extensively studied; the only example that I’ve seen is the RD-600, which used a low power mode with an MHD that the plasma passed directly through in a closed loop system (more on this system in the future); this is obviously not the same type of system being discussed here. The only other similar parallel is with the Werka-type dusty plasma fission fragment rocket, which uses a helium-xenon Brayton turbine to provide about 100 kWe for housekeeping and system electrical power. However, this system only rejected less than 1% of the total FFRE waste heat.
    1. The proper power conversion system needs to be selected, thruster selection is in a similar position, and other systems would go through similar selection and optimization processes would need to be done. This is made more complex due to the necessity to match the PCS and thermal management of the system to the reactor, which has not been finalized and is currently very inefficient in terms of fissile material. If a heat engine is used, the quality of the heat reduces, meaning larger (and heavier) radiators are needed, as well.

Fluid Fuels: Promises of Advanced Rockets, but Many Challenges to Overcome

As we’ve seen in this brief overview of fluid fueled NTRs, the diversity in advanced NTR designs is broad, with an incredible amount of research having been done over the decades on many aspects of this incredibly promising, but challenging, propulsion technology. From the chemically challenging liquid fuel NTR, with several materials and propellant feed challenges and options, to the reliable vapor core, to the challenging but incredibly promising gas core NTR, the future of nuclear thermal propulsion is far more promising than the already-impressive solid core designs we’ve examined in the past.

Coming up on Beyond NERVA, we will examine each of these types in detail in a series of blog posts, and the information both in this post and future posts will be adapted into more-easily referenced web pages. Interspersed with this, I will be working on filling in details on the Rover series of engines and tests on the webpage, and we may also cover some additional solid core concepts that haven’t been covered yet, especially the pebble-bed designs, such as Timberwind and MITEE (the pebble-bed concept is also sometimes called a fluidized bed, since the fuel is able to move in relation to the other pellets in the fueled section of the reactor in many designs, so can be considered a hybrid system in some ways).

With the holiday season, life events, and concluding the project which has kept me from working as much as I would have liked on here in the coming months, I can’t predict when the next post (the first of three on liquid fueled NTRs) will be published, but I’ve already got 7 pages written on that post, six on the next (bubblers), and 6 on the final in that trilogy (radiator LNTR) with another 4 on vapor cores, and about 10 pages on the basic physics principles of gas core reactor physics (which is insanely complex), so hopefully these will be coming in the near future!

As ever, I look forward to your feedback, and follow me on Twitter, or join the Beyond NERVA Facebook page, for more content!

References

This is just going to be a short list of references, rather than the more extensive typical one, since I’m covering all this more in depth later… but here’s a short list of references:

Liquid fuels

“Analysis of Vaporization of Liquid Uranium, Metal, and Carbon Systems at 9000 and 10000 R,” Kaufman et al 1966 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19660025363.pdf

“A Technical Report on Conceptual Design Study of a Liquid Core Nuclear Rocket,” Nelson et al 1963 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19650026954.pdf

“Performance Potential of a Radiant Heat Transfer Liquid Core Nuclear Rocket Engine,” Ragsdale 1967 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19670030774.pdf

Vapor and Droplet Core

“Droplet Core Nuclear Reactor (DCNR),” Anghaie 1992 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19920001887.pdf

“Vapor Core Propulsion Reactors,” Diaz 1992 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19920001891.pdf

Gas Core

“Analytical Design and Performance Studies of the Nuclear Light Bulb Engine,” Rogers et al 1973 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19730003969.pdf

“Open Cycle Gas Core Nuclear Rockets,” Ragsdale 1992 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19920001890.pdf

“A Study of the Potential Feasibility of a Hybrid-Fuel Open Cycle Gas Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket,” Beveridge 2017 https://etd.iri.isu.edu/ViewSpecimen.aspx?ID=439