SNTP-Based H2 Exhaust Scrubbing

The most detailed analysis of this concept was in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program, run by the Department of Energy – better known as Project Timber Wind. This was a far larger engine (111kN as opposed to 25 kN) engine, so the exhaust volume would be far larger. This also means that the costs associated with the program would be larger due to the higher exhaust flow rate, but unfortunately it’s impossible to make a reasonable estimate of the cost reduction, since these costs are far from linear in nature (it would cost significantly more than 20% of the cost estimated for the SNTP engine). However, it’s a good example of the types of facilities needed, and the challenges associated with this approach.

SNTP Test Facility

Image courtesy DOE

The primary advantage to the ETS concept is that it doesn’t use H2O to cool the exhaust, but LH2. This means that the potential for release of large amounts of (very mildly) irradiated water into the groundwater supply are severely limited (although the water solubility of the individual fission products would not change). The disadvantage, of course, is that it requires large amounts of LH2 to be on hand. At Stennis SC, this is less of an issue, since LH2 facilities are already in place, but LH2 is – as we saw in the last blog post – a major headache. It was estimated that either a combined propellant-effluent coolant supply could be used (~181,440 kg), or a separate supply for the coolant system (~136,000 kg) could be used (numbers based on a maximum of 2 hours burn time per test). To get a sense of what this amount of LH2 would require, two ~1400 kl dewars of LH2 would be needed for the combined system, about ¾ of the LH2 supply available at Kennedy Space Center (~3200 kl).

Once the exhaust is sufficiently cooled, it is a fairly routine matter to filter out the fission products (a combination of physical filters and chemical reactions can ensure that no radionucleides are released, and radiation monitoring can verify that the H2 has been cleaned of all radioactive effluent). In the NF-1 test, water was used to capture the particulate matter, and the H2O was passed through a silica gel bed to remove the fission products. An activated carbon filter was used to remove the noble gasses and other gaseous and aerosol fission products. After this, depending on the facility setup, it is possible to recycle a good portion of the H2 from the test; however this has massive power requirements for the cryocoolers and hydrogen densification equipment to handle this massive amount of H2.

Saddle Mountain facility diagram

Alternative test facility layout

Due to both the irradiation of the facilities and the very different requirements for this type of test facility, it was determined that the facilities built for the NRDS during Rover would be insufficient for this sort of testing, and so new facilities would need to be constructed, with much larger LH2 storage capabilities. One more recent update to the concept is brought up in the SAFE proposal (next section), using already existing facilities at the Nevada Test Site (now National Nuclear Security Site), in the U-la or P-tunnel complexes. These underground facilities were horizontal, interconnected tunnel complexes used for sub-critical nuclear testing. There are a number of benefits to using these (now-unused) facilities for this type of testing: first, the rhyolite that the P-tunnel facility is cut into is far less permeable to fission products, but remains an excellent heat sink for the thermal effects of the exhaust plume. Second, it’s unlikely to fracture due to overpressure, although back-pressure into the engine itself will constrain the minimum size of the tunnel. Third, a hot cell can be cut into the mountain adjacent to the test location, making a very well-shielded facility for cool-down and disassembly beside the test location, eliminating the need to transport the now-hot engine to another facility for disassembly.

After the gas has passed through a length of tunnel, and cooled sufficiently, a heat exchanger is used to further cool the gas, and then it’s passed through an activated charcoal filter similar to the one used in the NF-1 test. This filtered H2 will then be flared off after going through a number of fission product detectors to ensure the filter maintained its’ integrity. The U-la tunnels are dug into alluvium, so we’ll look at those in the next section.

One concern with using charcoal filters is that their effectiveness varies greatly depending on the temperature of the effluent, and the pressure that it’s fed into the filter. Indeed, the H2 can push fission products through the filter, so there’s a definite limit to how small the filter can be. The longer the test, the larger the filter will be. Activated charcoal is relatively cheap, but by the end of the test it will be irradiated, meaning that it has to be disposed of in nuclear waste repositories.

Cost estimates were avoided in the DOD assessment, due to a number of factors, including uncertain site location and the possibility of using this facility for multiple programs, allowing for cost sharing, but the overall cost for the test systems and facilities was estimated to be $500M in 1993 dollars. Most papers seem to think that this is the most expensive, and least practical, option for above ground NTR testing.

Sources:

Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Final Report, R.A. Haslett, Grumman Aerospace Corp, 1995 http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA305996

Space Nuclear Thrmal Propulsion Test Facilities Subpanel Final Report, Allen et al, 1993 https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19930015916.pdf