SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor

S8ER Cutaway
Image DOE

The first reactor in this series, the SNAP 8 Experimental Reactor (S8ER), went critical in May 1963, and operated until 1965. it operated for 2522 hours at above 600 kWt, and over 8000 hours at lower power levels. The fuel elements for the reactor were 14 inches in length, and 0.532 inches in diameter, with uranium-zirconium hydride (U-ZrH, the same basic fuel type as the SNAP-2/10A system that we looked at last time) enriched to 93.15% 235U, with 6 X 10^22 atoms of hydrogen per cubic centimeter.

S8ER Cutaway Drawing
S8ER Fuel Element

The biggest chemical change in this reactor’s fuel elements compared to the SNAP-2/10A system was the hydrogen barrier inside the metal clad: instead of using gadolinium as a burnable poison (which would absorb neutrons, then decay into a neutron-transparent element as the reactor underwent fission over time), the S8ER used samarium. The reasons for the change are rather esoteric, relating to the neutron spectrum of the reactor, the particular fission products and their ratios, thermal and chemical characteristics of the fuel elements, and other factors. However, the change was so advantageous that eventually the different burnable poison would be used in the SNAP-2/10A system as well.

S8ER Cross Section
Core cross-section, image DOE

The fuel elements were still loaded in a triangle array, but makes more of a cylinder than a hexagon like in the -2/10A, with small internal reflectors to fill out the smooth cylinder of the pressure vessel. The base and head plates that hold the fuel elements are very similar to the smaller design, but obviously have more holes to hold the increased number of fuel elements. The NaK-78 coolant (identical to the SNAP-2/10A system) entered in the bottom of the reactor into a space in the pressure vessel (a plenum), flowed through the base plate and up the reactor, then exits the top of the pressure vessel through an upper plenum. A small neutron source used as a startup neutron source (sort of like a spark plug for a reactor) was mounted to the top of the pressure vessel, by the upper coolant plenum. The pressure vessel itself was made out of 316 stainless steel.

Instead of four control drums, the S8ER used six void-backed control drums. These were directly derived from the SNAP-2/10A control system. Two of the drums were used for gross reactivity control – either fully rotated in or out, depending on if the reactor is under power or not. Two were used for finer control, but at least under nominal operation would be pretty much fixed in their location over longer periods of time. As the reactor approached end of life, these drums would rotate in to maintain the reactivity of the system. The final two were used for fine control, to adjust the reactivity for both reactor stability and power demand adjustment. The drums used the same type of bearings as the -2/10A system.

S8ER Facility Setup
SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor test facility, Santa Susana Field Site, image DOE

The S8ER first underwent criticality benchmark tests (pre-dry critical testing) from September to December 1962 to establish the reactor’s precise control parameters. Before filling the reactor with the NaK coolant, water immersion experiments for failure-to-orbit safety testing (as an additional set of tests to the SCA-4 testing which also supported SNAP-8) was carried out between January and March of 1963. After a couple months of modifications and refurbishment, dry criticality tests were once again conducted on May 19, 1963, followed in the next month with the reactor reaching wet critical power levels on June 23. Months of low-power testing followed, to establish the precise reactor control element characteristics, thermal transfer characteristics, and a host of other technical details before the reactor was increased in power to full design characteristics.

S8ER Core Containment Structure

The reactor was shut down from early August to late October, because some of the water coolant channels used for the containment vessel failed, necessitating the entire structure to be dug up, repaired, and reinstalled, with significant reworking of the facility being required to complete this intensive repair process. Further modifications and upgrades to the facility continued into November, but by November 22, the reactor underwent its first “significant” power level testing. Sadly, this revealed that there were problems with the control drum actuators, requiring the reactor to be shut down again.

After more modifications and repairs, lower power testing resumed to verify the repairs, study reactor transient behavior, and other considerations. The day finally came for the SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor achieved its first full power, at temperature testing on December 11, 1963. Shortly after, the reactor had to be shut down again to repair a NaK leak in one of the primary coolant loop pumps, but the reactor was up and operating again shortly after. Lower power tests were conducted to evaluate the samarium burnable poisons in the fuel elements, measure xenon buildup, and measure hydrogen migration in the core until April 28, interrupted briefly by another NaK pump failure and a number of instrumentation malfunctions in the automatic scram system (which was designed to automatically shut down the reactor in the case of an accident or certain types of reactor behaviors). However, despite these problems, April 28 marked 60 days of continuous operation at 450 kWt and 1300 F (design temperature, but less-than-nominal power levels).

S8ER Drive Mechanism
S8ER Control drum actuator and scram mechanism, image DOE

After a shutdown to repair the control drive mechanisms (again), the reactor went into near-continuous operation, either at 450 or 600 kWt of power output and 1300 F outlet temperature until April 15, 1965, when the reactor was shut down for the last time. By September 2 of 1964, the S8ER had operated at design power and temperature levels for 1000 continuous hours, and went on in that same test to exceed the maximum continuous operation time of any SNAP reactor to date on November 5 (1152 hours). January 18 of 1965 it achieved 10,000 hours of total operations, and in February of that year reached 100 days of continuous operation at design power and temperature conditions. Just 8 days later, on February 12, it exceeded the longest continuous operation of any reactor to that point (147 days, beating the Yankee reactor). March 5 marked the one year anniversary of the core outlet temperature being continuously at over 1200 F. By April 15, when the reactor was shut down for the last time it achieved an impressive set of accomplishments:

  1. 5016.5 continuous operations immediately preceeding the shutdown (most at 450 kWt, all at 1200 F or greater)
  2. 12,080 hours of total operations
  3. A total of 5,154,332 kilowatt-hours of thermal energy produced
  4. 91.09% Time Operated Efficiency (percentage of time that the reactor was critical) from November 22, 1963 (the day of first significant power operations of the reactor), and 97.91% efficiency in the last year of operations.

Once the tests were concluded, the reactor was disassembled, inspected, and fuel elements were examined. These tests took place at the Atomics International Hot Laboratory (also at Santa Susana) starting on July 28, 1965. For about 6 weeks, this was all that the facility focused on; the core was disassembled and cleaned, and the fuel elements were each examined, with many of them being disassembled and run through a significant testing regime to determine everything from fuel burnup to fission product percentages to hydrogen migration. The fuel element tests were the most significant, because to put it mildly there were problems.

S8ER FE Damage Map
Core cross section with location and type of damage to fuel elements, image DOE

Of the 211 fuel elements in the core, only 44 were intact. Many of the fuel elements also underwent dimensional changes, either swelling (with a very small number actually decreasing) across the diameter or the length, becoming oblong, dishing, or other changes in geometry. The clad on most elements was damaged in one way or another, leading to a large amount of hydrogen migrating out of the fuel elements, mostly into the coolant and then out of the reactor. This means that much of the neutron moderation needed for the reactor to operate properly migrated out of the core, reducing the overall available reactivity even as the amount of fission poisons in the form of fission products was increasing. For a flight system, this is a major problem, and one that definitely needs to be addressed. However, this is exactly the sort of problem that an experimental reactor is meant to discover and assess, so in this way as well the reactor was a complete success, if not as smooth a development as the designers would likely have preferred.

S8ER FE Damage Photo

It was also discovered that, while the cracks in the clad would indicate that the hydrogen would be migrating out of the cracks in the hydrogen diffusion barrier, far less hydrogen was lost than was expected based on the amount of damage the fuel elements underwent. In fact, the hydrogen migration in these tests was low enough that the core would most likely be able to carry out its 10,000 hour operational lifetime requirement as-is; without knowing what the mechanism that was preventing the hydrogen migration was, though, it would be difficult if not impossible to verify this without extensive additional testing, when changes in the fuel element design could result in a more satisfactory fuel clad lifetime, reduced damage, and greater insurance that the hydrogen migration would not become an issue.

S8ER Post irradiation fuel characteristics

The SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor was an important stepping stone to nuclear development in high-temperature ZrH nuclear fuel development, and greatly changed the direction of the whole SNAP-8 program in some ways. The large number of failures in cladding, the hydrogen migration from the fuel elements, and the phase changes within the crystalline structure of the U-ZrH itself were a huge wake-up call to the reactor developers. With the SNAP-2/10A reactor, these issues were minor at best, but that was a far lower-powered reactor, with very different geometry. The large number of fuel elements, the flow of the coolant through the reactor, and numerous other factors made the S8ER reactor far more complex to deal with on a practical level than most, if any, anticipated. Plating of the elements associated with Hastelloy on the stainless steel elements caused concern about the materials that had been selected causing blockages in flow channels, further exacerbating the problems of local hot spots in the fuel elements that caused many of the problems in the first place. The cladding material could (and would) be changed relatively easily to account for the problems with the metal’s ductility (the ability to undergo significant plastic deformation before rupture, in other words to endure fuel swelling without the metal splitting, cracking, fracturing or other ways that the clad could be breached) under high temperature and radiation fluxes over time. A number of changes were proposed to the reactor’s design, which strongly encouraged – or required – changes in the SNAP-8 Development Reactor that was currently being designed and fabricated. Those changes would alter what the SNAP-8 reactor would become, and what missions it would be proposed for, until the program was finally put to rest.

References and Further Reading

Overall Program

Fuel Element Development and Analysis

SNAP 8 EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT ACCEPTANCE TESTING, Hubbel et al AI 1964 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4461309

SNAP 8 experimental reactor fuel element behavior: Atomics International task force review, Pearlman et al 1966 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4196260

Post-operation Evaluation of Fuel Elements from the SNAP 8 Experimental Reactor, Olson et al, AI 1967 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4476724

A Document Review to Characterize Atomics International SNAP Fuels Shipped to INEL 1966-1973, Kneff et al, 1995 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/137420

Fuel Matrix Development and Behavior

Non-nuclear performance testing SNAP 8 experimental reactor fuel elements final report, Fitzgerald et al 1966 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4462590

Fuel Clad Development and Behavior

SNAP 8 experimental reactor (S8ER) hydrogen barrier coating development, Webb 1964 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4471081

HIGH-TEMPERATURE BERYLLIUM CORROSION PROTECTION Phase Report Coating Development and Evaluation, September 22, 1961 to May 15, 1962, Armor Research Foundation staff for AI 1962 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4160331

Nuclear Design and Analysis

SNAP 8 experimental reactor critical experiment, ed Crouter 1964 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4471079

Primary Coolant System Design and Analysis

Component Design, Development, and Analysis

FABRICATION OF CERAMIC INTERNAL REFLECTOR FOR THE SNAP 8 EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR , Langrod 1962 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4815729

Progress Reports

Postoperation Systems Analysis

DISASSEMBLY AND POSTOPERATION EXAMINATION OF THE SNAP 8 EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR, Dyer 1967 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4275472

ELECTRON MICROPROBE ANALYSIS OF IRRADIATED S8ER CLADDING, Krupp 1967
https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6281808

Safety and Decommissioning of Facilities

SNAP 8 EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR (S8ER) FINAL SAFEGUARDS SUMMARY REPORT, AI Staff 1962 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4468163

Post-Remedial Action Survey Report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility Building 010 Site Santa Susana Field Laboratories, November 1979-November 1981 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6975138

Environmental Assessment For Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center (including AI Santa Susanna Laboratory). Final Report, DOE 2003 https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/823425